Epilepsy Talk

Anti-Epilepsy Drugs and Their Side-Effects…

October 24, 2017
12 Comments

For people with epilepsy, Anti Epilepsy Drugs (AEDs) are the most common method used to control seizures. Although there are more than 40 different types of epilepsy, the right medication or combination of medications can usually control seizures.  However 30% of people are drug resistant, owing to either their gene factors or biological makeup.

The most important consideration in your treatment is identifying the exact type of epilepsy you have, therefore you may want to consult more than one doctor.

Medications prescribed will also depend on factors such as which side-effects you can actually tolerate, other illnesses you may have, and how the drug should be taken.

It may take several months before the best drug and dosage are determined for you. After all, medicine is more of an art than a science.  And finding the right combination can literally be a crap shoot.  I know for me and many others, it took many months to get it “right.”


Anti-Epilepsy Drugs and Osteoporosis – It’s Not Just a Women’s Disease

October 22, 2017
32 Comments

A research team consisting of epilepsy specialists and epidemiologists (persons who study the causes and control of diseases) reports on a study that answered an important but simple question:

Do anti-seizure drugs cause reductions in bone density?


Sex and Epilepsy — The Ultimate Challenge

May 8, 2017
2 Comments

It’s the $64,000 question.

Can I have sex with epilepsy, all the AEDs, and side-effects?

The answer is yes.

If you’re willing to be flexible.


Suicide and Epilepsy

June 12, 2016
22 Comments

“There is an underlying joint susceptibility to suicide attempts and epilepsy, and it can’t be ignored, because epilepsy in general is more than just seizures,” Dr. Dale Hesdorffer of Columbia University in New York City, told Reuters Health in a telephone interview.


Epilepsy and Neuroengineering — A Brave New World of Possibilities

April 28, 2013
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Traditionally, the mainstay of epilepsy therapy has been treatment with antiepileptic drugs (AEDs).

But for 30% of those affected, no combination of standard therapy — medications and/or surgery — can control their seizures.

Although more new AEDs have come to the market over the past 10 years than during any other time in history, their primary contribution has been to improve adverse effects of medication, rather than to make more people seizure-free.

The proportion of people with epilepsy worldwide — whose seizures cannot be controlled by medical therapy — has remained unchanged, despite all these new pharmaceutical interventions…


Zinc Can Help You Think!

June 19, 2012
7 Comments

Zinc should be part of any balanced diet, but it also regulates signals in your brain. It’s been found to play a critical role in coordinating communication between cells in the brain, possibly governing the formation of memories and controlling the occurrence of epileptic seizures…


Epilepsy Medication Conflicts…

November 22, 2011
9 Comments

Common wisdom is that it’s best to take one anti-seizure medication. But for many of us, monotherapy just doesn’t work. However adjunct therapy has its dangers. And both treatments carry their own interactive risks – even with things as innocent as aspirin.

For example, some seizure medicines can lower or raise the levels of other types of medicines in your blood. Some combinations cause the levels of both medications to fall. Some cause one level to fall and one level to rise. And some cause unpredictable side- effects…

So I hunkered down to discover the unhappy marriages between anti-seizure meds. I’m sure there are many more, but it’s a start. And more than I knew before embarking on this research. Here’s what I discovered…


If You’re Thinking Of Getting Pregnant…

May 31, 2010
79 Comments

Years ago, women who had epilepsy were often discouraged from getting pregnant. Today, that’s no longer the case. Thanks to early and regular prenatal care, more than 90 percent of pregnant women who have epilepsy deliver healthy babies, according to the Epilepsy Foundation.


Anti-Epilepsy Drugs and Osteoporosis – It’s Not Just a Women’s Disease

April 17, 2010
53 Comments

A research team consisting of epilepsy specialists and epidemiologists (persons who study the causes and control of diseases) reports on a study that answered an important but simple question: Do anti-seizure drugs cause reductions in bone density?


    About the author

    Phylis Feiner Johnson

    Phylis Feiner Johnson

    I've been a professional copywriter for over 35 years. I also had epilepsy for decades. My mission is advocacy; to increase education, awareness and funding for epilepsy research. Together, we can make a huge difference. If not changing the world, at least helping each other, with wisdom, compassion and sharing.

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