Epilepsy Talk

Epilepsy Differences Between Men and Women?

December 6, 2017
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Men and women have long suspected that our brains are wired a bit differently. Now science is starting to back up this notion.

A new study finds that men have more synapses connecting the cells in a particular part of the brain than women do.

In short, each sex excels at different types of cognitive functions.


New Hope for Drug Resistant Epilepsy

November 13, 2015
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Drug-resistant epilepsy with uncontrolled severe seizures — despite state-of-the-art medical treatment — continues to be a major problem for up to 30% of patients with epilepsy. Although drug resistance may fluctuate in the course of treatment, for most patients, drug resistance seems to be continuous.


Epilepsy and Neuroengineering — A Brave New World of Possibilities

April 28, 2013
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Traditionally, the mainstay of epilepsy therapy has been treatment with antiepileptic drugs (AEDs).

But for 30% of those affected, no combination of standard therapy — medications and/or surgery — can control their seizures.

Although more new AEDs have come to the market over the past 10 years than during any other time in history, their primary contribution has been to improve adverse effects of medication, rather than to make more people seizure-free.

The proportion of people with epilepsy worldwide — whose seizures cannot be controlled by medical therapy — has remained unchanged, despite all these new pharmaceutical interventions…


Children’s Brain Surgery…Preparing YOUR Child…

April 22, 2012
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There is no “welcome” sign to the world of childhood brain surgery. And the resulting combination of fear, shock, and pain is almost too much to bear.

No amount of preparation or knowledge can help to ease or minimize the situation.

But preparing a child for surgery emotionally, is one of the most important things you can do. Surgery, without proper explanations and preparation, can traumatize a child…


Concussions: Helping Your Brain Heal

May 24, 2011
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It’s a conundrum. Some people get epilepsy / seizures from concussion-related accidents. And many people with epilepsy have concussions as a result of their condition.

Although I didn’t “get” my epilepsy from a fall or a concussion, I’ve certainly had my fair share of them. In fact, recently, I had a real doozy. And I’m sure you’re no stranger to concussions either.

Usually the doc’s attitude is “wait and see.” (Easy for them to say!)

But recently, I read about some wonderful research in Bottom Line’s Daily Health News (a terrific daily newsletter that I both wrote for and receive daily.)


Vagus Nerve Stimulation…Is it for YOU?

March 13, 2011
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Having a Vagus Nerve Stimulator implanted can be a tough decision. Is it right for you? Will it work? What are the side effects and consequences?

I did some research and got the low-down on what it is, how it works and some interesting statistics. (If you are already acquainted with the VNS and are on the fence, you might want to just skip down to risks and benefits sections.)


Epilepsy and Celiac Disease

February 24, 2011
16 Comments

Celiac disease is closely related to various neurological disorders, with a higher incidence of epilepsy. And in one study, epilepsy was observed in 5.5% of all cases of celiac disease.

Basically, celiac disease is a matter of poor absorption and can cause wide ranging nutritional deficiency. All body systems — including the brain and nervous system — can ultimately be affected from this disease through either a direct immunological attack/response to gluten (found in wheat, barley, rye and oats) or through vitamin deficiencies associated with malabsorption.

Seizures seen in association with celiac disease are frequently difficult to control and, at least in some cases, this is due to poor AEDs absorption. Epilepsy occurs twenty times more often in persons with celiac disease than those in the general population. Calcium deposits form in the brain because of a deficiency of folic acid.


Conditions Commonly Misdiagnosed as Epilepsy

February 17, 2010
224 Comments

A moment of unresponsiveness — the inability to recall what just happened…convulsions or jerking movements…sudden stiffness of the body. These are classic symptoms of an epilepsy seizure — triggered by abnormal electrical impulses in the brain.

And while these symptoms may indicate epilepsy, other brain abnormalities or injuries could also lead to seizures.

Having a seizure doesn’t automatically mean you have epilepsy. And without testing, the diagnosis – or misdiagnosis – can be pretty scary. There are loads of conditions that have symptoms similar to epilepsy. Here are the most common…


    About the author

    Phylis Feiner Johnson

    Phylis Feiner Johnson

    I've been a professional copywriter for over 35 years. I also had epilepsy for decades. My mission is advocacy; to increase education, awareness and funding for epilepsy research. Together, we can make a huge difference. If not changing the world, at least helping each other, with wisdom, compassion and sharing.

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