Epilepsy Talk

Seizures and Steroids

December 5, 2016
4 Comments

I always thought that steroids were the kind used by athletes and bodybuilder to pump up their performance. Yes, they do exist and, yes they are quite dangerous, but those aren’t the kind of steroids this article is about.

In fact, anyone who has epilepsy should NOT take anabolic steroids because they may change the level of anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs) in the blood and may make seizures more likely.

The steroids I’m talking about are naturally occurring hormones. Common oral prednisolone or less common/higher risk ACTH — which have a place in the management of severe epilepsies.


Epilepsy and Diabetes — Confusion or Common Cure?

November 23, 2016
4 Comments

You might be surprised to hear it, but according to recent research, epilepsy and diabetes have more in common than we thought.

The key commonality is fluctuating blood sugar. People with hyperglycemia tend to have focal or local seizures. And those who are hypoglycemic, tend to have tonic-clonic seizures…


Seizures…Memory…Depression. YES, They Are Linked!

November 17, 2016
16 Comments

At least one in every eight people with epilepsy also has depression.

Epilepsy can have different effects on memory functions and depression for various reasons.

Because the portion of the brain where memory and emotions are stored — the limbic system — can be disturbed by epileptic seizures.

In fact, memory problems are one of the most reported problems that coincide with epilepsy.


If You DON’T Have Epilepsy, Then WHAT Is It???

November 13, 2016
18 Comments

You might call them “imitators” of epilepsy, but that’s kind of extreme. You might say “similar” or you might say “confused”, which I think they are.

In a previous article titled “Conditions Commonly Misdiagnosed as Epilepsy,” I thought I had it all covered…


Neurotherapy for Epilepsy, Pain, Parkinson’s and More…

October 16, 2016
8 Comments

People with Epilepsy, Parkinson’s Disease, Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD) or addictions may be able to learn how to ‘think themselves better’ by altering their brain waves to improve their symptoms.

A new form of treatment called neurotherapy (also known as neurofeedback) is similar to biofeedback but has a unique focus on controlling brain wave activity rather than skin temperature, heart rate, breathing and muscle tension.


The Stigma of Epilepsy

October 12, 2016
19 Comments

The stigma is ancient and it still remains today.

Laws in the United States and Great Britain that prohibited epileptic people to marry were just repealed in the late 1980s and early 1990s.

Until the late 1970s, legislations in the United States also prevented epileptic people from entering public buildings such as restaurants, shopping centers, and theaters. [US Department of Health]

Although these laws are no longer in effect, the underlying social divisions that they have created in the past thirty years are still present today.


Is Epilepsy Inherited?

October 4, 2016
14 Comments

Just because you have a parent, sibling, cousin or aunt who has epilepsy doesn’t necessarily mean you’ll have it also.

In fact, if you have a close relative with epilepsy, the chance of you having epilepsy is only about 2-8%, depending on the specific type of epilepsy.

The risk in the general population is about 1-2%. On the other hand, there is a 92-98% chance for the close relative of someone with epilepsy to NOT have the same condition!


Conversion Disorder and Epilepsy

September 5, 2016
8 Comments

Is it epilepsy or conversion disorder?

The term “conversion” comes from the idea that psychological distress is being converted into a physical symptom.

The cause is not known.


Autoimmune Epilepsy — Cause of Previously Unexplained Seizures?

August 5, 2016
6 Comments

Some patients with unexplained partial seizures which are medication resistant may have “autoimmune epilepsy” — epilepsy characterized by of autoimmune antibodies.

Although autoimmune epilepsy is still rare, it’s become an increasingly recognized cause of epilepsy, which might have been previously thought to be of unknown cause.


Syncope or Seizure?

July 9, 2016
10 Comments

Studies have now confirmed what some doctors have long suspected — many young people who are given the diagnosis of epilepsy (or seizure disorder) apparently don’t have epilepsy at all.

Instead, they have a condition known as syncope…

Syncope (sing’-koe-pee), the medical term for fainting, is the sudden loss of consciousness and physical collapse due to lack of blood and oxygen to the brain.


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    About the author

    Phylis Feiner Johnson

    Phylis Feiner Johnson

    I've been a professional copywriter for over 35 years. I've also had epilepsy for decades. My mission is advocacy; to increase education, awareness and funding for epilepsy research. Together, we can make a huge difference. If not changing the world, at least helping each other, with wisdom, compassion and sharing.

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