Epilepsy Talk

Epilepsy & Migraines — Kissing Cousins

March 18, 2019
12 Comments

A strong relationship between migraines and epilepsy has long been suspected.

But now it is fact, according to extensive research cited by Steven Karceski, MD in Practical Neurology Magazine.

The International Headache Society (IHS) criteria divides headache disorders into two main groups, with similarities to groups of epilepsies:


Traumatic Brain Injury and Epilepsy

February 16, 2019
20 Comments

In a fraction of a second, head trauma can dramatically change a person’s life.

Head trauma caused by falls, physical abuse, violence, vehicle crashes and sporting accidents, not to mention modern warfare.

However, it’s important to realize that not all head injuries, even severe ones, result in seizures. And seizures frequently occur in people who haven’t experienced head trauma.

But close associations do exist between head trauma and seizures — as much as twelve times as opposed to someone without a head trauma.


Probiotics — Food for Thought

February 10, 2019
4 Comments

I’ve been eating yogurt ever since I was in college. It’s yummy, friendly to your digestion and the perfect thing for a quick breakfast or snack. And it’s cheap. (Who has money in college?)

Later, I learned that I was smarter than I thought.

Because yogurt contains probiotics — “good guys” or friendly bacteria — chasing away the “bad guys” — or damaging bacteria from your digestive system.

So, probiotics are known to promote a healthy gut, but can they promote a healthy mind?


Scientists Find a Possible Link Between Gut Health and Depression

February 8, 2019
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New research has identified a possible link between gut health and brain function.

Building on this work, the study reveals that clinical depression could also be affected by the amounts of certain bacteria in the gut.

For all of us with depression, this could be a real breakthrough.


Auras without Seizures

January 24, 2019
64 Comments

Do any of these sensations sound familiar to you?

Suddenly you’re sweating, flushed, become pale or have goosebumps.

Your stomach feels queasy, like you’re going to puke.

There’s a foreboding or fear that something awful is about to happen…


Is Epilepsy Inherited?

January 12, 2019
10 Comments

Just because you have a parent, sibling, cousin or aunt who has epilepsy doesn’t necessarily mean you’ll have it also.

In fact, if you have a close relative with epilepsy, the chance of you having epilepsy is only about 2-5%, depending on the specific type of epilepsy.


People Talk About Their Out-Of-Body Experiences

December 14, 2018
8 Comments

Alterations of consciousness are critical factors in the diagnosis of epileptic seizures. Some people report sensations of separating from the physical body, experiences that may, in rare cases, resemble spontaneous out-of-body experiences.

New research has linked these experiences to instabilities in the temporal lobe, and to errors in the body’s sense of itself — even in healthy individuals.

With simple partial seizures, some people report having out-of-body experiences. Time may seem distorted as well.

These out-of-body experiences (OBE) can vary from person to person, but they often involve the sense of floating above one’s actual body and looking down. For neuroscientists, the phenomenon is a puzzle and an opportunity: Understanding how the brain goes awry can also illuminate how it is supposed to work.


Epilepsy Versus “Pseudo-Seizures”

December 9, 2018
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Epilepsy is not a dirty word.  Neither is pseudo-seizures. 

But they both coexist, side by side.

One of the most common complications is the misconception that people who suffer from pseudo-seizures are hypochondriacs, hysterics, or “faking it.”

The name for the condition alone, “pseudo-seizures,” perpetuates that misunderstanding.

The term “pseudo-seizures” is extremely misleading. The seizures are quite real, and people who have then do not have conscious, voluntary control over them.


Updated — 40+ Different Kinds of Seizures

November 29, 2018
13 Comments

When I was first diagnosed with epilepsy, there were two kinds of epilepsy. Grand Mal and Petit Mal. (Can you guess how old I am?)

Now, things are much more different and difficult. No more cut and dried.

So, please, if you have any additions, subtractions or corrections, feel free to chime in.

Because I don’t pretend to be an expert. In fact, this has certainly been a learning experience, from start to finish.

Here, to the best of my knowledge, are the 40+ different types of epilepsy.


Stevens-Johnson Syndrome — a danger for those on Dilantin or Lamictal

November 19, 2018
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This article is not for those with a weak stomach.  Because Stevens-Johnson Syndrome is an ugly and sometimes deadly disease.

But if you are on Dilantin or Lamictal, I urge you to read this information.

According to the Mayo Clinic: Stevens-Johnson Syndrome is a rare, serious condition, thought to be caused by a disorder of your immune system.


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    About the author

    Phylis Feiner Johnson

    Phylis Feiner Johnson

    I've been a professional copywriter for over 35 years. I also had epilepsy for decades. My mission is advocacy; to increase education, awareness and funding for epilepsy research. Together, we can make a huge difference. If not changing the world, at least helping each other, with wisdom, compassion and sharing.

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