Epilepsy Talk

People Talk About Their Out-Of-Body Experiences

December 14, 2018
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Alterations of consciousness are critical factors in the diagnosis of epileptic seizures. Some people report sensations of separating from the physical body, experiences that may, in rare cases, resemble spontaneous out-of-body experiences.

New research has linked these experiences to instabilities in the temporal lobe, and to errors in the body’s sense of itself — even in healthy individuals.

With simple partial seizures, some people report having out-of-body experiences. Time may seem distorted as well.

These out-of-body experiences (OBE) can vary from person to person, but they often involve the sense of floating above one’s actual body and looking down. For neuroscientists, the phenomenon is a puzzle and an opportunity: Understanding how the brain goes awry can also illuminate how it is supposed to work.


11 Companies Hiring for Jobs You Can Do at Home

December 12, 2018
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These companies have remote jobs that may be great for people with chronic illnesses or disabilities.


Epilepsy Versus “Pseudo-Seizures”

December 9, 2018
2 Comments

Epilepsy is not a dirty word.  Neither is pseudo-seizures. 

But they both coexist, side by side.

One of the most common complications is the misconception that people who suffer from pseudo-seizures are hypochondriacs, hysterics, or “faking it.”

The name for the condition alone, “pseudo-seizures,” perpetuates that misunderstanding.

The term “pseudo-seizures” is extremely misleading. The seizures are quite real, and people who have then do not have conscious, voluntary control over them.


Epilepsy and Education…Coming Out Of The Shadows

December 6, 2018
10 Comments

It starts in the playground.  A kid has a seizure and everybody freaks out. 

Nobody knows what to do.  Maybe not even the school nurse. 

Even though epilepsy first aid is a cinch.

It’s frightening to see a child seize and then, based on that fright, they think:

“I can’t deal with this.”


Epilepsy Stats and Facts

December 1, 2018
10 Comments

I call epilepsy a “stealth disease”, because it’s difficult to imagine how so few people know about a “silent” condition that affects so many.

For example, few people know:


Updated — 40+ Different Kinds of Seizures

November 29, 2018
13 Comments

When I was first diagnosed with epilepsy, there were two kinds of epilepsy. Grand Mal and Petit Mal. (Can you guess how old I am?)

Now, things are much more different and difficult. No more cut and dried.

So, please, if you have any additions, subtractions or corrections, feel free to chime in.

Because I don’t pretend to be an expert. In fact, this has certainly been a learning experience, from start to finish.

Here, to the best of my knowledge, are the 40+ different types of epilepsy.


Where’s The Funding? Epilepsy As An Orphan

November 25, 2018
17 Comments

Here are the facts, unhappy though they may be…

Epilepsy is the 4th most common neurological problem – only migraine, stroke, and Alzheimer’s disease occurs more frequently.

Its prevalence is greater than autism spectrum disorder, cerebral palsy, multiple sclerosis and Parkinson’s disease combined.

As many people die from epilepsy as from breast cancer.

There are 200,000 new cases of epilepsy each year, and a total of more than 3 million Americans are affected by it.

Yet, public and private funding for epilepsy research lags far behind other neurological afflictions, at $35 a patient (compared, for instance, with $129 for Alzheimer’s and $280 for multiple sclerosis).


Gratitude is the Attitude…

November 21, 2018
16 Comments

Sometimes, I get into a funk so bad that it’s like a black hole. 

Until I remember the safety ladder that I always carry in my pocket.

I think of at least five things I’m grateful for.

Or if I’m down there awhile, I stretch it to ten.

Here are the top five on my gratitude list:


Stevens-Johnson Syndrome — a danger for those on Dilantin or Lamictal

November 19, 2018
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This article is not for those with a weak stomach.  Because Stevens-Johnson Syndrome is an ugly and sometimes deadly disease.

But if you are on Dilantin or Lamictal, I urge you to read this information.

According to the Mayo Clinic: Stevens-Johnson Syndrome is a rare, serious condition, thought to be caused by a disorder of your immune system.


Dilantin — What People Are Saying…

November 13, 2018
23 Comments

When I was first diagnosed with epilepsy back in 1969, the availability of AEDs was limited.

Phenobarbital or Dilantin.

Pick your poison.

I chose Dilantin. It was not a pretty picture.


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    About the author

    Phylis Feiner Johnson

    Phylis Feiner Johnson

    I've been a professional copywriter for over 35 years. I also had epilepsy for decades. My mission is advocacy; to increase education, awareness and funding for epilepsy research. Together, we can make a huge difference. If not changing the world, at least helping each other, with wisdom, compassion and sharing.

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