Epilepsy Talk

Medical Marijuana — It’s Here to Stay…

May 19, 2019
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Let’s face it. The time has come.

Even the FDA has opened its eyes with new clinical trials.

Although the AMA chooses to keep their heads in the sand. For now.

It used to be popular to debate the merits and dangers of medical marijuana.

For example, it could lead to addiction. Like cocaine. (Oh please!)

But now, there’s clinically proven scientific proof, with more to come…

“After 4,000 years of humans taking cannabis for epilepsy, we have scientific evidence it works.” — Orrin Devinsky MD, Harvard University, on results from his team’s late-stage clinical trial of cannabidiol to treat Dravet syndrome.

And that’s just the tip of the iceberg…


Clinical Trials — International Database

January 28, 2017
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There’s a whole treasure trove of clinical trials information now available as a free service of the National Institutes of Health, developed by the National Library of Medicine (NLM).

ClinicalTrials.gov is a web-based resource that provides patients, family members, health care professionals, researchers, and the public with easy access to information on publicly and privately supported clinical studies on a wide range of diseases and conditions.

Presently, there are 131,167 studies with locations in 179 countries, including the U.S. Studies are easy to search for by topic and location.


Clinical Trials Explained

May 7, 2016
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New therapies, including medications, medical devices and surgical procedures, are evaluated in research studies known as clinical trials.

Often these new therapies are investigational, which means they are not yet approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for general use.

Participation in clinical trials offers the potential for new treatment options and allows patients to participate with researchers in driving the discovery of effective therapies for epilepsy…


Dravet Syndrome — New Hope Through Research

August 25, 2013
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Severe Myoclonic Epilepsy of Infancy was first described by Dravet in 1978.

In 1992, Dravet and colleagues found at least 172 published cases. Since then there have been numerous new cases.

Dravet Syndrome, also known as Severe Myoclonic Epilepsy of Infancy (SMEI), is a rare and catastrophic form of intractable epilepsy that begins in infancy.


    About the author

    Phylis Feiner Johnson

    Phylis Feiner Johnson

    I've been a professional copywriter for over 35 years. I also had epilepsy for decades. My mission is advocacy; to increase education, awareness and funding for epilepsy research. Together, we can make a huge difference. If not changing the world, at least helping each other, with wisdom, compassion and sharing.

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