Epilepsy Talk

Marijuana has won… | April 17, 2021

It’s more than time. The jury is no longer out. States have been weighing in. And the answer has been a resounding : “Yes”.

It’s a massive shift that took place over just a few years.

A decade ago, no states allowed marijuana for recreational use; the first states to legalize cannabis in 2012, Colorado and Washington, did so through voter-driven initiatives.

Now, 17 states and Washington, DC, have legalized marijuana (although DC doesn’t yet allow sales), with five enacting their laws through legislatures, showing even typically cautious politicians are embracing the issue.

https://www.vox.com/2021/4/12/22371929/marijuana-legalization-new-mexico-virginia-new-york-biden

To subscribe to Epilepsy Talk and get the latest articles, simply go to the bottom of the right column, enter your email address and click on “Follow”


22 Comments »

  1. Reblogged this on Ken's Devotions.

    Like

    Comment by Kenneth — April 17, 2021 @ 10:11 AM

  2. So HOW SAFE is the marijuana which is to be used for seizures? and WHAT TYPE of seizures that it is suppose to help in ending seizures ? I hear no facts said to me by neurologists or anyone else, who says I could be helped by marijuana CBD oils or hemp or whatever from the marijuana plant or weed. There has to be some way where those facts that everyone says it is safe & good to use for seizures, that THEY SHOULD TELL US what seizure types will it help & what seizure types may be worse or wont be helped.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by James D — April 17, 2021 @ 1:15 PM

    • The jury is still out on that one, James.

      Like

      Comment by Phylis Feiner Johnson — April 17, 2021 @ 1:23 PM

      • Actually, I find you can learn a lot more from the people who work at your local MJ dispensary than you can from a neurologist. They can tell you about which strain has which ratio of CBD/THC, how to do micro-dosing to find your perfect dosage, which strain has which effect so one or the other would be better for your condition. For example, my seizure disorder is exclusively nocturnal so I need a variety that is going to get me to sleep and keep me there at a dose that won’t leave me groggy the morning. I have found it. All help from a “bud-tender” not a neurologist.

        Liked by 1 person

        Comment by paleobird — April 17, 2021 @ 1:43 PM

    • i also would like to know what type of seizures it will help elsie

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by jeff — April 19, 2021 @ 9:22 PM

  3. Paleobird, I have to say your experiences are far different from my husband’s. Consider yourself lucky, which I’m sure you do.

    He has been from dispensary to dispensary trying to find the right medical marijuana mix for his pain.

    Experts, advisors and “bud-tenders” have been no help.

    He’s spent mucho money experimenting for himself. Sometime with mixed results.

    He has tried different forms, different mixtures, different ratios, you name it.

    Some CBC that he’s gotten online has been helpful. But basically, he’s on his own, looking for a solution.

    I wish we were there, so you could help guide us.

    Like

    Comment by Phylis Feiner Johnson — April 17, 2021 @ 1:55 PM

  4. Phyllis, I keep trying to post a comment but it doesn’t post. I don’t know what is going on. Does your page have a character limit? It was a bit long.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by paleobird — April 17, 2021 @ 2:54 PM

    • I don’t think so. There have been some very long entries in the last subject. (???)

      Like

      Comment by Phylis Feiner Johnson — April 17, 2021 @ 2:56 PM

      • Well, I have been self-experimenting and researching this topic a lot in the past few years as I have used MJ to titrate off of my meds. I don’t claim “expert” status but here is a bit of what I’ve learned for what it’s worth.

        1)CBD extracts vs. whole plant: The CBD part of MJ does not get you high at all so if you want to stay firmly sober this is for you. However, the CBD, THC, and terpenes in MJ naturally work together in a synergistic way that is better for many people. this is called “The Entourage Effect”. I tried CBD extracts and they did absolutely nothing for me but YMMV.

        2)Smoking vs. edibles: Smoking is better if you want an immediate fast acting effect but edibles are better if you want a more lasting time-released effect. How fast edibles kick in is dependent on what else is in your tummy digesting. A big meal will slow things down.

        3)Choice in edibles: There is a huge variety available these days from mints to gummy bears to infused butters and even beverages. Shop around and find what works for you.

        4)Store bought vs homemade edibles: I would advise starting off with the store bought ones because they have a measured predictable dosage clearly marked on the label. Homemade is much cheaper but the potency can vary a lot depending on the strength/freshness of the weed and how long you cooked it etc. There are lots of recipes available online and cooking your own can be fun but this is more “pro-level”.

        5)A word of caution for beginners on edibles. They can be tricky because they take a while to kick in. You think, “This isn’t doing anything” then take a bunch more and then, all of a sudden, it all catches up with you and you are seriously stoned. If you just go slowly and wait for the effects you will be fine.

        6)Micro-dosing: Most edibles have a very small dose in each gummy or mint or chocolate square allowing you to customize your dose. This requires some time and experimentation to get right but it does work. I have found a cinnamon mint that I like and taking five of them per night keeps me asleep with no seizures without leaving me foggy headed in the morning. You have to find your perfect balance.

        7)CBD vs. THC: All edibles and most smokables have the ratio of these two clearly labeled. If you tend toward anxiousness, you want to get a strain with higher CBD and less THC. If you tend toward somnolence/depression, a higher THC/CBD ratio would work better for you.

        Like

        Comment by paleobird — April 17, 2021 @ 3:04 PM

      • Hmm. After the first time the whole thing deleted, I copy/pasted it. Now when I try to post it I get an error message saying “Duplicate post”.

        Like

        Comment by paleobird — April 17, 2021 @ 3:06 PM

      • Perhaps because it is a copy/paste your Askimet software reads it as spam.

        Like

        Comment by paleobird — April 17, 2021 @ 3:09 PM

      • Paleobird, I don’t know why it would read it as spam. How very frustrating!

        Like

        Comment by Phylis Feiner Johnson — April 17, 2021 @ 3:15 PM

  5. CBD oil was suggested to me and I asked my neurologist who said it wouldn’t with my type of epilepsy – I guess perhaps because it’s intractable and the VNS works well. Leon

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Leon Chavarria — April 17, 2021 @ 3:13 PM

  6. I’m not quite sure that your neurologist is enlightened. Perhaps you should track down a consultant or even look online. That’s what my husband finally ended up doing.

    Then it was trial and error. It still is.

    Like

    Comment by Phylis Feiner Johnson — April 17, 2021 @ 3:19 PM

  7. Well, I have been self-experimenting and researching this topic a lot in the past few years as I have used MJ to titrate off of my meds. I don’t claim “expert” status but here is a bit of what I’ve learned for what it’s worth.

    1)CBD extracts vs. whole plant: The CBD part of MJ does not get you high at all so if you want to stay firmly sober this is for you. However, the CBD, THC, and terpenes in MJ naturally work together in a synergistic way that is better for many people. this is called “The Entourage Effect”. I tried CBD extracts and they did absolutely nothing for me but YMMV.

    2)Smoking vs. edibles: Smoking is better if you want an immediate fast acting effect but edibles are better if you want a more lasting time-released effect. How fast edibles kick in is dependent on what else is in your tummy digesting. A big meal will slow things down.

    3)Choice in edibles: There is a huge variety available these days from mints to gummy bears to infused butters and even beverages. Shop around and find what works for you.

    4)Store bought vs homemade edibles: I would advise starting off with the store bought ones because they have a measured predictable dosage clearly marked on the label. Homemade is much cheaper but the potency can vary a lot depending on the strength/freshness of the weed and how long you cooked it etc. There are lots of recipes available online and cooking your own can be fun but this is more “pro-level”.

    5)A word of caution for beginners on edibles. They can be tricky because they take a while to kick in. You think, “This isn’t doing anything” then take a bunch more and then, all of a sudden, it all catches up with you and you are seriously stoned. If you just go slowly and wait for the effects you will be fine.

    6)Micro-dosing: Most edibles have a very small dose in each gummy or mint or chocolate square allowing you to customize your dose. This requires some time and experimentation to get right but it does work. I have found a cinnamon mint that I like and taking five of them per night keeps me asleep with no seizures without leaving me foggy headed in the morning. You have to find your perfect balance.

    7)CBD vs. THC: All edibles and most smokables have the ratio of these two clearly labeled. If you tend toward anxiousness, you want to get a strain with higher CBD and less THC. If you tend toward somnolence/depression, a higher THC/CBD ratio would work better for you.

    The key is patience and a spirit of adventure.
    Paleobird

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Phylis Feiner Johnson — April 17, 2021 @ 3:24 PM

    • Paleobird, I’m glad I was able to cut and paste your article. Even if I got the credit. 🙂

      I never knew about the “The Entourage Effect” so, thanks very much for that information, in addition to everything else.

      I know we ALL can learn and benefit from both your knowledge and experiences.

      As for Arthur, he won’t smoke. Conversely, gummies worked like a dream. But, they’re not allowed in PA. (???) So that’s unfortunate.(And amazingly stupid!)

      Like

      Comment by Phylis Feiner Johnson — April 17, 2021 @ 3:31 PM

      • Oh well, I guess double posted is better than disappeared off into the ether. Thanks, Phyllis.

        Liked by 1 person

        Comment by paleobird — April 18, 2021 @ 9:10 PM

  8. I’m UK, and I grew up with hippies and the weed, seeing how badly they were affected and I don’t think enough research has been made for it’s medical use. There doesn’t seem to be any regulated production, you just go and buy something that says it doesn’t have the dangerous addictive part but can you trust that?

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Gail Barry — April 18, 2021 @ 3:20 AM

    • Gail, you are assuming there is a “dangerous addictive part”. There isn’t. MJ is not and never has been addictive. The most danger you will be in is the danger of sitting on the couch and eating a whole bag of potato chips. As compared to the side effects of most AEDs, that is pretty mild.
      Those hippies you are remembering were altering their consciousness with a lot of other things (like LSD, cocaine, heroin etc.) which definitely were dangerous. It wasn’t the weed.

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by paleobird — April 18, 2021 @ 9:08 PM

  9. I think that moderation, like paleobird pointed out, is the key.

    Recreational use leans towards getting high which requires a much higher dose (and different intent) than medical marijuana.

    As you saw from your hippie days it was a much different scene. I understand. (I was there, too.)

    But don’t let that taint a new type of marijuana for a new reason.

    Like

    Comment by Phylis Feiner Johnson — April 18, 2021 @ 4:00 AM

    • Yes, when MJ production was strictly for the “getting hammered” market, the push was for growing strains that were higher and higher in THC.
      But now there is a whole new market in medical use MJ which has incentivized the production of more CBD rich strains such as Charlotte’s Web which is used for epilepsy in children.

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by paleobird — April 18, 2021 @ 9:17 PM


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

    About the author

    Phylis Feiner Johnson

    Phylis Feiner Johnson

    I've been a professional copywriter for over 35 years. I also had epilepsy for decades. My mission is advocacy; to increase education, awareness and funding for epilepsy research. Together, we can make a huge difference. If not changing the world, at least helping each other, with wisdom, compassion and sharing.

    View Full Profile →

    Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive free notifications of new posts by email.

    Join 3,150 other followers

    Follow Epilepsy Talk on WordPress.com
%d bloggers like this: