Epilepsy Talk

Can PTSD Cause Brain Fog? | September 21, 2022

Going through trauma is not rare. About 6 out of every 10 (or 60%) of men and 5 of every 10 (or 50%) of women experience at least one trauma in their lives.

Women are more likely to experience sexual assault and child sexual abuse. Men are more likely to experience accidents, physical assault, combat, disaster, or to witness death or injury.

The effects of trauma can linger. If you sometimes lack mental clarity and feel fatigued, you may be experiencing PTSD-related brain fog.

Because of its broad effects on the nervous system, PTSD can cause some less well-known symptoms too, including dissociation, brain fog, and physical pain.

To find out more, click here: https://psychcentral.com/ptsd/ptsd-brain-fog?slot_pos=article_1&utm_source=Sailthru%20Email&utm_medium=Email&utm_campaign=weekly&utm_content=2022-09-21&apid=&rvid=c5278151bab3deaa55d0330afb95ad3e8eb78bade1cb9ccd018690faa8915510

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10 Comments »

  1. I have PTSD after living in years of Irish terrorism, I used what I now know dissociation to cope with bad scenes, I’d come round in a safe place with no knowledge of how I got there, I can’t get a satisfactory diagnosis, I’m just supposed to have focal awareness with some recognition of the strange world around, but I still do the walking, working blacked out, no reason how I got somewhere, and no one seems to have witnessed a seizure. PTSD winds you up tight, ready to run if danger suddenly appears, I’m wound up, have to make myself relax. Another strange thing I’ve read of, but again no medical confirmation, the over production of the stress hormone cortisol can cause cataracts, clots and more which I have, like Cushing’s Syndrome. It’s an interesting subject, can cause so many things, I’m in the UK, our armed services aren’t treated well if they get PTSD, perhaps being bad tempered, violent, addicted to drugs and drink, and thrown into jail with no knowledge that they have a medical condition

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Miss Gail Barry — September 21, 2022 @ 10:47 AM

  2. I knew cortisol affected your moods and emotions, but I didn’t know it could cause things like cataracts, clots and Cushing’s Syndrome.

    I looked it up and came across this interesting article: Beware High Levels of Cortisol, the Stress Hormone https://www.premierhealth.com/your-health/articles/women-wisdom-wellness-/beware-high-levels-of-cortisol-the-stress-hormone

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Phylis Feiner Johnson — September 21, 2022 @ 11:16 AM

  3. Nearly died one time- total paralysis with ventilator & etc. for 3 months. Years of struggling to function again. PTSD symptoms are mild but pervasive.

    Liked by 2 people

    Comment by Michael Bowles — September 21, 2022 @ 11:43 AM

  4. Who is to say that this PTSD of people taking AED’s like Dilantin, or any other of the BARBITUATES, when they slowed down the brain development with teens & infants taking those drugs, that those drugs were the causes of people now having PTSD ? I remember well taking DILANTIN, for more than 26 years, and I was 27 years old coming off the drug. In 1987, it was like a real boost of energy in my brain chemistry & feeling as if my life was changing, with NO or very little petit mals happening to me, as I said for 20+ years that DILANTIN ALONE was not helping my condition back then. They 4 years later after the GULF WAR started, everyone was stressed out over that, and that morning our troops entered into QUAIT, I had my 3rd grand mal seizure in my life, with NO reason to point to DILANTIN, then the hell returned with taking Phenobarbital & Tegretol, which both combined then in 1990 made me feel like I could not live my life without the STRESS being in it from a brain chemistry that never seems to be normal, like I thought it was for a period of almost 3 years, when I felt my best in over 62 years. MAYBE TODAY that can be changing with XCOPRI, as now I am over 10 months without a seizure.

    Liked by 2 people

    Comment by James D — September 21, 2022 @ 3:28 PM

  5. Thank goodness for Xcopri. I wish it had come into your life sooner.

    (P.S. How’s your mom doing?)

    Like

    Comment by Phylis Feiner Johnson — September 21, 2022 @ 4:12 PM

  6. Thanks for this.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Flower Roberts — September 21, 2022 @ 5:33 PM

  7. Has anyone every had a device called EPIMINDER put in their brain to monitor their seizures and it gives them a notice when a seizure is about to happen. It communicates through your phone. Is there anything on the market out there similar to this that also nurostimulates that suppress the seizure at the same time? It does 2 jobs at once!! What would be the side effects from this epiminder? Any thing like this oversea?

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by TOM WHITE — September 22, 2022 @ 12:34 AM

  8. My dad was a Vietnam Vet. He had cataracts. And he never talked about the war so I never knew much about his inner world. He gardened in his free time. I think this helped him put his excess energy into something good and useful.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by skydancingcrow — September 27, 2022 @ 12:44 AM


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    About the author

    Phylis Feiner Johnson

    Phylis Feiner Johnson

    I've been a professional copywriter for over 35 years. I also had epilepsy for decades. My mission is advocacy; to increase education, awareness and funding for epilepsy research. Together, we can make a huge difference. If not changing the world, at least helping each other, with wisdom, compassion and sharing.

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