Epilepsy Talk

What’s the worst accident you’ve ever had? | February 18, 2020

The worst accident I ever had was the one that caused my seizures.

I was at an ice rink, speed skating, when some jerk put his foot out. (A real funny joke.)

Into the boards I went, flying over the ice.

Only to land up laid out in the lap of the skating coach for who knows how long later.

After that came the falling that became my trademark.

I fell upstairs, downstairs, on the pavement (resulting in some lovely concussions), but my parents refused to recognize them as seizures.

I was just clumsy. And not diagnosed until two years later. (Tonic-Clonic and absence seizures.) And then treated like a leper.

It was a long journey to become who I am today.

What was YOUR worst accident?

To subscribe to Epilepsy Talk and get the latest articles, simply go to the bottom box of the right column, enter your email address and click on “Follow”

 

 


Posted in Epilepsy
Tags: ,

45 Comments »

  1. Goodmorning Phylis 😊. Wow!! Accidents lol 😂 shucks I would have to say mine also have to do with falling up or down stairs as well OR USING AN AXE TO CUT WOOD OR KNIFE TO CUT MEAT!!!!! Lol although I think it probably hurt and scared everyone around me more than myself to be honest with you. Even one time (WHAT WAS I THINKING) I actually picked up an iron pot of grease that had been boiling and used to make something we had for supper one day!!!!!!! The funny thing is a normal person probably would have instantly dropped all of the boiling grease all over!! But I didn’t want to burn anyone so I swore and my mother inlaw turned and realized I had that pot in my hand and SHE SCREAMED!!!!! I turned back to the stove and put it down on the stove and everyone else jumped into action!! Or yes SWIMMING IN A CREEK!!!!!!! Turned out my grandma and great grandma could REALLY RUN FAST (apparently I wouldn’t really know), but I always knew they could anyways 😘🙏🏼🦅😇💞😘

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Kathy S.B — February 18, 2020 @ 10:22 AM

    • AN AXE! 🙂

      What were you doing swimming in a creek?

      Oh, our fearless Kathy.

      Liked by 2 people

      Comment by Phylis Feiner Johnson — February 18, 2020 @ 11:22 AM

      • Well first of all I was trying to split frozen hamburger patties apart and I stabbed them, but I holding them in my hand when I hit them with the butcher knife and the knife went into my palm. Then I was trying to cut wood for a fire in a barbecue we were having. I knew I hit my finger but I didn’t know where. My best friend realized I hit something and she calmly asked me “did you chop off your finger?”. I looked at her and quietly said “I don’t know?”. She rushed me into emergency and I hit the tip of my thumb (thank god it grew back and is okay now). As for the creek yes it was a creek by where our family barbecues. All I remember is jumping in the tube while the adults were cooking. I came to and a dog and my grandma were holding me giving me mouth to mouth resuscitation and I started coughing. My little brother looked at me and said “HOLY COW SIS!!!!!!! YOU SHOULD OF SEEN THEM RUN!!!!! GRANDMA AND GREAT GRANDMA CAN REALLY RUN FAST HOLY COW!!!!!!! 🙏🏼🦅😇💕😘

        Liked by 1 person

        Comment by Kathy S.B — February 18, 2020 @ 11:38 AM

      • I have a friend, who’s a chef, and in the course of working, he chopped his pinky finger OFF.

        Holding the chopped off digit in his hand, he went to the ER where he underwent emergency surgery. They got most of it reattached.

        But it’s the first time I heard of a hospital admission without registration!

        Liked by 1 person

        Comment by Phylis Feiner Johnson — February 18, 2020 @ 11:44 AM

      • I BELIEVE IT!! Shucks that must of REALLY HURT!!

        Liked by 1 person

        Comment by Kathy S.B — February 18, 2020 @ 9:53 PM

      • I know is was stupid!! But at the same time I wanted to play and swim and NEVER GIVE ANYONE AN EXCUSE NOT TO AT LEAST TRY AND HAVE FUN!! 😘

        Liked by 1 person

        Comment by Kathy S.B — February 18, 2020 @ 11:42 AM

  2. On my way down, I hit the back of my neck on a trash can at the airport (you know, one of those super solid ones), temporarily suffering quadriplegia. It took over 6 months to learn to walk again. Now, 14 years later, I still have visible gait issues, can’t run, and have spotty neuralgia.

    Liked by 2 people

    Comment by Alison Zetterquist — February 18, 2020 @ 11:01 AM

    • OMG, Alison. What a horrible random thing.

      Just goes to show, one random act, can change your life forever.

      I’m so very sorry.

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by Phylis Feiner Johnson — February 18, 2020 @ 11:24 AM

    • I am SORRY TO HEAR THAT HAPPENED TO YOU!! I HOPE AND PRAY YOUR GETTING BETTER!! Be strong!

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by Kathy S.B — February 18, 2020 @ 11:40 AM

      • Thank you, Kathy. My wonderful family and friends gave me all the support I needed to remain strong!

        Liked by 2 people

        Comment by Alison Zetterquist — February 18, 2020 @ 12:30 PM

      • THAT IS ALL WE NEED!! 🙏🏼🦅😇😘💞

        Liked by 1 person

        Comment by Kathy S.B — February 18, 2020 @ 9:54 PM

    • Goodevening Allison 😊. At least you STILL TRYING TO BE WELL!! AND LIVE!! That’s all that matters and family and friends ARE THE WORLD!! 😘

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by Kathy S.B — February 18, 2020 @ 9:57 PM

  3. Please clarify – your falling down stairs was related to or because of seizures? A particular kind of seizure? My heart rate is speeding up, writing this.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by HoDo — February 18, 2020 @ 12:44 PM

    • I had absence seizures walking both up the stairs and down. The walking up was particularly unpleasant. Not too face-friendly!

      Like

      Comment by Phylis Feiner Johnson — February 18, 2020 @ 2:20 PM

      • Once again, you have explained my past. I spent my childhood falling down stairs; or, rather, finding myself on the way down with no idea how I got there. It was written off as “wanting attention.” So it was not a sin, after all. Amazing!
        Thank you.

        Liked by 1 person

        Comment by HoDo — February 18, 2020 @ 5:20 PM

      • You wanted attention. I was clumsy. Hello? We had EPILEPSY, stupid!

        Liked by 1 person

        Comment by Phylis Feiner Johnson — February 18, 2020 @ 5:36 PM

      • In some circles, being a sinner, which can be punished, is preferable to having epilepsy. Or, as Lewis Carroll wrote, “He only does it to annoy.” Thank you for reminding me that Carroll was not writing about me.

        Like

        Comment by HoDo — February 18, 2020 @ 6:11 PM

      • But he might have been writing about himself. He had epilepsy.

        Lewis Carroll (1832 – 1898) In his famous stories “Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland” and “Through the Looking-Glass,” Carroll may have been writing about his own temporal lobe seizures. The very inspiration for Alice’s adventures — that of falling down a hole — is familiar to many people with seizures. Alice often feels that her own body (or the objects around her) are shrinking or growing before her eyes, another seizure symptom.

        Epilepsy Hall of Fame https://epilepsytalk.wordpress.com/?p=11852&preview=true

        Like

        Comment by Phylis Feiner Johnson — February 18, 2020 @ 6:19 PM

      • Lewis Carroll and Alice and weirdness. Yes, I’ve done the bit about feeling very tall, but didn’t think of Carroll. Somatic stuff can be very distracting.
        And if there are no meds, well, you have to write a classic.

        Again, thank you.

        Liked by 2 people

        Comment by HoDo — February 18, 2020 @ 6:45 PM

    • Please don’t worry. It was such a fluke. I didn’t fall down stairs, but, rather, I had a tonic clonic seizure and hit my neck on one of those immovable trash cans in an airport. Yanks for your concern!

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by Alison Zetterquist — February 18, 2020 @ 3:24 PM

  4. Hmm, which one to mention, when i was 5 i fell out of truck since i didn’t close the door correctly and fell out when in a turn onto my head. Woke up in hospital, had a bad concussion.

    Once was bicycling with brother when in an argument he pushed me and i somehow i fell on my head. Concussion followed as well as i slowly went out of consciousness.

    The first grand mal i had was when they found my baseball size brain tumor, that was my first time i lost consciousness and felt horrible afterwards, worst head ache i had ever had.

    Then the grand mal where i fell out of bed and hit the back of my arm against the metal bed frame, in repeated motion. I hit it so much it caused nerve damage in my fingertips. Now that would have been one time someone could of helped me with my seizures, to move me away from hitting the bed frame.

    So now to the worst, going home from work on a busy freeway during rush hour i had a grand mal, woke up with like 5 fire trucks around me and the scene i caused. Luckily no one was injured and somehow from the lane closed to the other sided traffic i went and crossed the lanes in my direction and somehow hit a sound wall and came to a stop. I used to love to drive, after this happened my love for driving started to wain.

    Liked by 2 people

    Comment by Zolt — February 18, 2020 @ 1:00 PM

  5. I would be terrified to drive ever. But, I’m a wuss anyway.

    Do you think your concussions led to seizures? That’s what happened to me.

    Like

    Comment by Phylis Feiner Johnson — February 18, 2020 @ 2:23 PM

    • No, but they may have lead to the brain tumor. I started having seizures like a yr before they found brain tumor. At the time i hadn’t a clue what seizures were, other than the grand mal ones, even those i didn’t know much about. The tumor was becoming so big, it was just causing to much pressure on my brain. It also caused a twist/torque on my spinal cord. A yr before the tumor was found i started having seizures, didn’t know what they were at the time. Small ones at first, like numbness in my fingertips in a couple of my fingers, to drop down seizures. I had horrible headaches in the mornings at work, went to see my PCP about them, but that was useless, he didn’t do any tests or anything other than to give me pain relievers. ugh. In hind site i told the doc if someone complains of headaches and they have never before had headaches to make sure he does a ct scan minimum on them. I was 38 when they found my tumor and removed it asap for fear it would put me into a coma. ugh. Mon i went in to the ER Wed i was operated on and Sat i left the hospital. It went like clock work. In the areal where my seizures start, the surgeon said she had a hard time removing the tumor from that area. I had requested all the write up on my surgery, especially the Surgeons writeups.

      Liked by 2 people

      Comment by Zolt — February 18, 2020 @ 3:43 PM

      • Smart person.

        My friend had seizures which led to the discovery of a benign brain tumor that was removed. In the process, they nicked her executive functions.

        She was in one of the best rehab centers in the East. Used up all of her savings, investments, credit loans and at the end of one year, all she could do was say “dog” and toilet herself.

        Accidentally we became friends (it’s a loooong story) on epilepsy.com and the first time I met her, was was wearing prism glasses.

        (She could see but she couldn’t read.) All of those PMs and emails had been dictated to her partner who was acting on her behalf.

        I asked her what she wanted for lunch and she literally said: “What looks good to you?” I ordered, we visited, and I never knew until months later.

        That was 5 years ago. She’s like a Phoenix rising from the ashes.

        She’s literally rebuilt her brain. Although, obviously, she can’t be a psychotherapist anymore and lives on social security and disability, she is once again the talented, spirited being that she was. (Brilliant, too!)

        She plays the piano, the guitar and the piano. She cooks better than most chefs. She reads voraciously.

        She’s a walking miracle and her name is Sally Komar.

        To quote her, she once said: “Pain is inevitable. Suffering is optional.”

        Liked by 1 person

        Comment by Phylis Feiner Johnson — February 18, 2020 @ 5:10 PM

  6. Well, it’s the worst thing and best thing happening to me at the same time. I’m driving to a store just three blocks away from my house, have a seizure just before I get to the store and have the worst accident I ever had.

    I cracked my toe, was leaning at a 90-degree angle in the wrong direction which led to the L3 and L4 in my spine being out of place and the front part of my car was inches from crushing my legs. On top of that, I was never able to tell the paramedics not to take me to the hospital because I just blacked out but this time I needed them to take me and I was able to tell them “no” so I was wrong again.

    The best thing that came from this is I get a call from my mother-in-law to watch TV which showed me someone having a temporal lobectomy which led to me wanting surgery before I have another accident which led to over 19 years of seizure control. I still have to have shots for my spine every 5-6 years but I’ll take it if it means I don’t have seizures anymore.

    Liked by 2 people

    Comment by Ed Lugge — February 18, 2020 @ 4:38 PM

    • Geeze. It sounds like without the hospital, without the medical intervention and without the surgery, you would have been doomed.

      Bless you, for making the “right” decision.

      Like

      Comment by Phylis Feiner Johnson — February 18, 2020 @ 5:14 PM

  7. I fell from a high diving board when I was 14. I just remember stepping backward and the next thing was darkness, followed by me in an ambulance. I had a concussion. . . Water does feel like cement. My seizures started when I was 15, but it was never decided conclusively if it was due to my concussion a year earlier.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Donna Jones — February 18, 2020 @ 5:21 PM

    • As Zolt observed, if only someone had thought about doing a CT Scan!

      Oops.The first clinical CT scanners were installed between 1974 and 1976. That was way too late to help me.

      What about you, Zolt?

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by Phylis Feiner Johnson — February 18, 2020 @ 5:41 PM

  8. Mine was 14 yrs ago, so cat scans were common. Cat scans are xrays but instead of one xray, it takes many xrays to give a 3d effect. Mri uses radio waves to capture it’s images. So even a simple xray could of showed my baseball size tumor. It was after my operation that my seizures started to kick in on a more regular bases, to the point were for many yrs it was like one ever month. Now that i have more control over my life my seizures have also dramatically been reduced. Praise the lord.

    Liked by 2 people

    Comment by Zolt — February 18, 2020 @ 7:22 PM

  9. My seizures started like 1 yr before my tumor was found but they were small at first and happened like once every 3 months maybe more. Then the day i went to the ER was when they did a CT on me and found my tumor. After the removal the seizures started to increase to a regular schedule.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Zolt — February 18, 2020 @ 7:45 PM

    • OMG. You couldn’t get a break. First a tumor. Then brain surgery. (Which, I assume, they considered a success). And then seizures. WOW. 😦

      Like

      Comment by Phylis Feiner Johnson — February 18, 2020 @ 7:58 PM

  10. My brother and I were INSEPARABLE!! Oddly even in marriage. Him and I grew up across the street from one another our whole lives. Even in marriages (his and mine) we both still lived across the street from one another. All of our children are almost all the same ages. Yes he was with me when I almost drowned and on and on. After he passed away we were walking out my front door (my house was built in the late 1890’s) and I looked up at his house. Turned out I fell down 4 cement stairs and hit my head on all 4 landing at the bottom of the stairs. My husband picked me up and carried me into my house to bed. The next day (after my brothers funeral service) I went into my family doctor. I was given ativan and ibprophen and sent home. I remember telling my family doctor “I’m a hockey coach and the first thing I was taught and learnt because of myself was to TAKE A CT SCAN AND MRI!! Your not doing either and your sending me home with ibprophen and ativan??”. Then I came home and it’s taken me 5 years to this day to KEEP GOING!!!!!!! For the LOVE OF MY HUSBAND, CHILDREN, MYSELF AND FAMILY AND FRIENDS I MAKE MYSELF PAINFULLY KEEP GOING!! Because all we NEED IS EACHOTHER!! And SOMEONE HAS TO GIVE MY BROTHERS CHILDREN AND MY OWN CHILDREN A REASON TO NEVER EVER QUIT!!!!!!! 😘🙏🏼🦅😇🙏🏼😘😘😘😘😘

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by Kathy S.B — February 18, 2020 @ 10:22 PM

    • You are one resilient lady, Kathy!

      The day my favorite auntie died, I drove off the road.

      When the police came (to push me and the car out of the small ditch, I created) I just kept sobbing: “My Auntie Died!”

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by Phylis Feiner Johnson — February 18, 2020 @ 10:37 PM

      • Thank you Phylis, but I believe WE “EPILEPTICS” are ALL RESILIENT ANGELS!! 😘🦅😇🙏🏼😘. Oddly it almost feels like a job to be resilient sometimes 💕. Thank you Phylis 😘

        Liked by 1 person

        Comment by Kathy S.B — February 18, 2020 @ 10:40 PM

  11. Here”s one: Coming to face flat in steering wheel airbag, after having seizure on busy city freeway. Lucky there was no guardrail, just grass and trees to stop car. Not injured but slightly dented 2 cars. Unlucky because boy did others involved say that yes, they were injured and cars were damaged. Hello insurance increase, good-bye license, forever.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by skolly9 — February 19, 2020 @ 7:37 PM

    • I was in the “high risk pool” once. That was it for me. I didn’t drive for years.

      But I was commuting to NYC then — 1 1/2 hours each way by train. So who had time to drive?

      My best friends were other commuters. I saw them more than my husband.

      (Distance makes the heart grow fonder?!?)

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by Phylis Feiner Johnson — February 19, 2020 @ 7:42 PM

  12. Weren’t you afraid of having a seizure on the train Phylis? I once had one on the bus and nobody noticed (cared)? A person rocking back and forth and talking to themselves isn’t always an oddity on transit.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by skolly9 — February 19, 2020 @ 8:04 PM

  13. LOL! I was with friends, so it didn’t really matter.

    Like

    Comment by Phylis Feiner Johnson — February 19, 2020 @ 9:27 PM

  14. Here’s one: 3 days ago have sz while doing dishes. Badly scalded right fingers-2nd and 3rd deg burns. It f*ing never ends……

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by skolly9 — February 23, 2020 @ 1:02 PM

  15. Ouch! How are you feeling now?

    Like

    Comment by Phylis Feiner Johnson — February 23, 2020 @ 1:07 PM

  16. Burns are reeeealy painful. But, I am learning how to be more ambidextrous lol.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by skolly9 — February 23, 2020 @ 1:15 PM

  17. Good skill to have. 🙂

    But not this way!

    Like

    Comment by Phylis Feiner Johnson — February 23, 2020 @ 1:17 PM


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

    About the author

    Phylis Feiner Johnson

    Phylis Feiner Johnson

    I've been a professional copywriter for over 35 years. I also had epilepsy for decades. My mission is advocacy; to increase education, awareness and funding for epilepsy research. Together, we can make a huge difference. If not changing the world, at least helping each other, with wisdom, compassion and sharing.

    View Full Profile →

    Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive free notifications of new posts by email.

    Join 2,917 other followers

    Follow Epilepsy Talk on WordPress.com
%d bloggers like this: