Epilepsy Talk

Super Seizure De-Stressor | December 27, 2019

We all know that stress is a super trigger for seizures.  Whether it’s family, friends, frustrations, conflict, work, school, fear, anger, anxiety, depression. The list is almost endless.

While nobody can say there’s a magic formula for de-stressing, you might give Progressive Muscle Relaxation a try. It’s a pretty powerful tool.

The advantages of Progressive Muscle Relaxation (or PMR) is that it’s easy to do, costs nothing, and requires only a little training and a few minutes of privacy.

Basically, what you are doing is deliberately tensing muscle groups, then releasing that tension. (That’s where the relaxation comes in!)

Here’s how simple it is:

1. Start by lying down on the floor, or sit in a comfortable chair…

2. Tense the muscles in your feet and hold that tension for about 10 seconds, being careful to not tense so tightly that cramps or pain occurs…

3. At the end of the 10 seconds, release the tension and drop your feet, allowing them to rest…

4. When your feet have tensed and released, go on to the next muscle group, in this case, your thighs…

5. Work through your entire body: feet, thighs, buttocks, stomach, chest, arms, neck, and then finally, facial muscles.

6. When you have tensed and released all the muscles in your body, search mindfully for any remaining spots of tension.

7. If you come across tension anywhere, mentally concentrate on this part and will it to relax. You can tense and relax any part again if it is needed.

8. After a few minutes, stretch, imagine the energy that is entering into each part of your body, then slowly sit up…refreshed and relaxed.

Reference:

http://www.epilepsyhealth.com/relaxation.html

 

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4 Comments »

  1. This is a very good practice on it’s own. If one would like to, one could inhale while tensing, hold the breath for the 10 seconds, and exhale slowly while releasing.

    Liked by 2 people

    Comment by Marlyn — December 27, 2019 @ 7:23 PM

    • Well Marilyn, now you know my secret to sanity! 🙂

      Whenever, wherever, no matter who I’m with, or what I’m doing…breath in for 10…exhale for 10…until every thing seems manageable again.

      Liked by 1 person

      Comment by Phylis Feiner Johnson — December 27, 2019 @ 10:11 PM

  2. If any of you uses ativan / lorazepam to ward off seizures – a fellow in my sobriety group who has major seizures said that what works for him is to take the Rx immediately after a stressful situation, rather than before. This works well for me. You might ask your doctor about it.

    Liked by 1 person

    Comment by HoDo — December 30, 2019 @ 10:37 AM

    • Same here, except I use Xanax. It seems to ward off the situation…better than taking it before.

      But I’m talking more about anxiety and panic attacks, which can trigger seizures.

      Like

      Comment by Phylis Feiner Johnson — December 30, 2019 @ 10:44 AM


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    About the author

    Phylis Feiner Johnson

    Phylis Feiner Johnson

    I've been a professional copywriter for over 35 years. I also had epilepsy for decades. My mission is advocacy; to increase education, awareness and funding for epilepsy research. Together, we can make a huge difference. If not changing the world, at least helping each other, with wisdom, compassion and sharing.

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