Epilepsy Talk

3 Revolutionary Epilepsy Watches! | September 13, 2018

They’re, attractive, efficient and a boon to the monitor market.

Meet the Smart Watches…

SUMMARY:

Apple SeizAlarm — A user-friendly iPhone and Apple Watch app which allow those with epilepsy and other seizure disorders to alert emergency contacts automatically when seizure-like motion is detected or manually if they need immediate help or think they might need help soon. Detects seizure-like motion, requests immediate help, seizure monitoring control, GPS location tracking, and event log tracking. Compatibility: Requires iOS 10.0 or later. Compatible with iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch.

Price: No cost for the app itself. Costs include the Apple device itself + $6.99/month or $69.99/year subscription for seizure detection and the help request service.

Without the “ALERTS” subscription, users will be able to log seizures manually but will not be able to send help requests. http://seizalarm.com/

EmbraceCreated to track your activity, stress and overall body balance, enabling people who live with Epilepsy to get an alert when an unusual event happens such as a convulsive seizure, warning them and their loved ones. To buy the Embrace (for a pricey $249), click on https://www.empatica.com/product-embrace

The SmartWatchA motion detecting and alerting wristwatch that can detect seizures and alert caregivers within seven to 10 seconds. http://www.smart-monitor.com/
For details and pricing information, please call 1-888-334-5045.

DETAILS:

APPLE SEIZALARM

SeizAlarm works during critical moments, giving a user the option to alert emergency contacts or press a delay function that starts a short timer.

If a user is in the middle of a seizure, an alert will go out immediately after the timer goes off, usually set for between 45 and 60 seconds.

A user’s activity is automatically logged or there is an option to manually chart symptoms and other experiences related to a seizure.

A web designer, Pabst was diagnosed nine years ago after experiencing a growing number of auras that were accompanied by a distinct pitch sounds.

He said medication has kept auras and grand mal seizures at bay since late last year.

The announcement of an Apple Watch came shortly after a seizure while he was in the middle of diagnostic tests.

“I’m pretty lucky because some people have grand mal seizures every day and can’t drive or do anything on their own,” Pabst said.

“My main goal is to contribute something helpful to the epilepsy community.”

Noted as one MedicalNewsToday’s top 10 epilepsy apps, the new innovative SeizAlarm is a user-friendly iPhone and Apple Watch app combined.

It’s designed to alert emergency contacts manually if you think you will need help soon.

Or automatically.

The app monitors for abnormal repetitive motion or elevated heart rate and notifies your emergency contacts accordingly.

If you plan on taking part in an activity that may trigger false seizure detection, you can disable this feature.

When a help request is sent, your location is captured and sent to your emergency contacts via GPS so that they can easily find you.

(If you plan on taking part in an activity that may trigger false seizure detection, you can disable this feature.)

And logs can be kept to retain activity and symptom information for your records.

Features:

Seizure-like detection is done via the motion sensors on the iPhone and/or motion sensors or heart rate sensor on the Apple Watch.

Sensitivity controls allow you to set customized settings specific to you.

When a potential seizure is detected, emergency contacts will automatically be contacted via multiple channels (text message, phone call and email).

Or send immediate help requests manually to emergency contacts.

There is also a manually activated time delayed help request feature (via the “Time Delayed Help” button) that is helpful for those that have localized seizures (auras) that may turn into generalized tonic-clonic seizures.

Custom-set the delay time in the settings.

When a seizure warning is initiated, you’ll see a countdown which can be extended via the press of a button.

If you end up becoming unresponsive, the timer will send a help request at the end of the countdown.

Help requests are sent via GPS coordinates (if available), so that your emergency contacts know exactly where you are.

You can also able to track your seizure events with precise logging features.

SeizAlarm also supports multiple emergency contact support, so more than one person can be contacted when you need help.

And international phone number support is available for emergency contact(s).

NOTES:

Compatibility: Requires iOS 10.0 or later. Compatible with iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch. Price: No cost for the app itself.

Costs include the Apple device itself + $6.99/month or $69.99/year subscription for seizure detection and the help request service.

Without the “ALERTS” subscription, users will be able to log seizures manually but will not be able to send help requests. http://seizalarm.com/

THE EMBRACE WATCH

It is the first medical-quality wearable, to help measure epileptic seizures, activity and sleep.

“It has been created to track your activity, stress and overall body balance, enabling people who live with Epilepsy to get an alert when an unusual event happens such as a convulsive seizure, warning them and their loved ones,” says Empatica, the watch’s creators.

It’s a medical quality device specifically created to monitor and better understand your body’s behavior and has been designed to be a gorgeous watch in the process.”

And the creators explain: “Not only during exercise, but also at work, during your commute, during the night, Embrace is the thinnest smart watch of this kind ever made.

“It snaps on, then tightens with a magnet for perfect fit.

“You can choose to use it simply as a watch to tell time, in which case your battery should last 6 months.”

Embrace makes it very easy to monitor physiological stress, sleep and physical activity.

You can check your entire day in a glance in a way that is easy to understand.

If you push yourself too much, the Embrace will gently remind you with a vibration that you need some time to recover.

You can customize it to suit your behavior and needs.

When people who have epilepsy wear Embrace, they will get an alert when an unusual event happens, like a convulsive seizure.

It will go via their smartphone to parents, roommates or caregivers, so somebody can check on them.”

The Embrace is water-resistant, uses Bluetooth Low Energy, and provides USB connectivity for charging.

Developed at M.I.T., its’ credentials are impressive.

When a seizure starts, the information is given to the app which will then alert designated caregivers that help is needed.

A rapid temperature change and signature shaking is picked up by the device, along with electrodermal activity which goes up, driven by the brain’s electrical hyperactivity.

Amazingly, Embrace can also measure brain wave suppression, which normally happens during seizures when brain waves tend to flatten to dangerous levels.

In addition, the new smartwatch can also monitor temperature changes and is equipped with gyroscope and accelerometers, which has the ability to track your activities.

When physical stress levels spike to a certain level, the watch begins to vibrate.

If you are unable to turn the vibration off, an alert is sent as many as five predetermined paired Embrace phones.

It will go to parents, roommates, or caregivers’ smart phone — vibrating to alert the companion watch of the medical situation or status, so somebody can check on you.

To buy the Embrace (for a pricey $249), click on: https://store.empatica.com/products/embrace-watch?variant=12580108355

THE SMART WATCH

Is a motion detecting and alerting wristwatch that can detect seizures and alert caregivers within seven to 10 seconds!

The device is a wristwatch which has a GPS module and a proprietary accelerometer/gyroscopic sensor inside to detect the excessive and repeated motions that happen during Generalized Tonic-Clonic seizures and some types of Myoclonic (grand mal) seizures.

It then records the time, duration and location of the occurrences. Automatic text message and phone call alerts are sent via Bluetooth to an android cell phone (an iPhone version is in the works) of one or two designated family members or caregivers.

And you can also summon help with a simple push of a “Help” button.

In addition, if you feel an aura coming on, you can press an “emergency button” that transmits an alert.

When an alert is sent, the SmartWatch also vibrates. If the alert was accidental, you can cancel it.

The SmartWatch can even be put in the “snooze” mode!

If you’re going to engage in anything, (such as climbing or running) that might inadvertently trigger the device, you can temporarily disable it for 10 minutes.

Then, when the “snooze” period is over, it automatically resumes functioning.

Aside from the real-time safety net that comes with wearing the watch, it also provides a complete archived record of all your seizure activity — when and how often your seizures occur, their severity, and how long they last.

All of which can supply valuable information to your caregivers, neurologist, physician, and most of all, YOU!

And, by keeping track of seizure severity and duration, medications and other treatments can be changed, adjusted or fine-tuned.

The SmartWatch will do this automatically, and with more precision.

There’s only glitch…

Because the SmartWatch is a motion detection unit, it’s only for those with Generalized Tonic-Clonic seizures and some types of Myoclonic seizures.

So, it’s not a universal seizure detector.

And even though it’s primarily worn on the wrist like a watch, you can wear the SmartWatch on your leg or ankle, if your abnormal movements are more pronounced there.

It’s fully portable and you can wear it in and out of bed, during sleep or waking hours, while it continuously monitors you and issues alerts.

While the SmartWatch isn’t about prediction — it is about detection.

All of which can go a long way towards independence, security and gathering real time information.

“If I couldn’t make that call for help, SmartWatch would make it for me. I have the help right at the tip of my fingers. It is AMAZING!” Evera, Daly City, CA

“With the SmartWatch I can relax… while my son sleeps I can relax knowing I have the SmartWatch monitoring him and I will be notified if a seizure starts while he sleeps.” Scott C, Westiminster, CA

“I love this watch so far! The SmartWatch alerted us to 2 seizures while she was sleeping. It definitely gives us peace of mind. She even has used the help button when she felt a seizure coming on. THANK YOU!!!!” Stacy B.

For an excellent description of the device with questions and answers, go to http://www.epilepsygroup.com/notes6-35-33/safety-in-epilepsy-potential-seizure-detection-device.htm

To compare the SmartWatch Standard and the SmartchWatch Premium, click here: http://www.smart-monitor.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/10/SmartWatch-Conmparison-3.pdf

NEW: Nightwatch — For Nocturnal Seizures

A new high-tech bracelet, developed by scientists from the Netherlands detects 85 percent of all severe night-time epilepsy seizures.

That is a much better score than any other technology currently available.

The researchers involved think that this bracelet, called Nightwatch, can reduce the worldwide number of unexpected night-time fatalities in epilepsy patients.

A new high-tech bracelet, developed by scientists from the Netherlands detects 85 percent of all severe night-time epilepsy seizures.

That is a much better score than any other technology currently available.

The researchers involved think that this bracelet, called Nightwatch, can reduce the worldwide number of unexpected night-time fatalities in epilepsy patients.

They published the results of a prospective trial in the scientific journal Neurology.

Now in development.

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References:

https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/319430.php

http://seizalarm.com/

http://seizalarm.com/faq/

https://www.iosfans.com/app/978475280/seizalarm-seizure-detection

ttp://www.medgadget.com/2014/11/embrace-watch-like-device-to-help-track-epileptic-seizures-video.html

http://www.forbes.com/sites/jenniferhicks/2014/11/30/a-smart-watch-to-manage-epileptic-seizures/

http://backerjack.com/embrace-smartwatch-watches-out-for-epilepsy-other-conditions/

http://www.smart-monitor.com/

http://www.engadget.com/2012/04/04/hands-on-with-smart-monitors-smartwatch-the-seizure-sensing-wr/

http://www.gizmag.com/smartwatch-anti-seizure-software/22064/

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2018/11/181105105351.htm?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+sciencedaily%2Fhealth_medicine%2Fepilepsy+%28Epilepsy+Research+News+–+ScienceDaily%29

 

 


7 Comments »

  1. Thank you, Phyllis! I hope you get some feedback from users of these devices.

    Like

    Comment by Martha — September 13, 2018 @ 12:19 PM

  2. Reblogged this on catsissie.

    Like

    Comment by catsissie — September 13, 2018 @ 7:29 PM

  3. Anyone out there with experience with these?

    Like

    Comment by Kate Jacques — September 18, 2018 @ 11:37 AM

  4. Hi Phylis Really grateful for your email re Apple Smart watch SeizAlarm app, considering getting one and didn’t even know about it until your email so thanks so much. Just wondering whether you have heard feedback regarding the app? I have done some research regarding length of time batteries last and seems much better with series three or new series four watches but I’m keen to find out how well people think the app itself works in detecting an actual seizure? Whether there are often false alarms or not? It occurred to me that in USA there may be a much larger body of users? Just wondering if you have heard any thing? Many thanks indeed for your time and help. Kind regards Caroline

    Sent from my iPhone

    >

    Like

    Comment by carolineespence — September 23, 2018 @ 10:18 AM


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    About the author

    Phylis Feiner Johnson

    Phylis Feiner Johnson

    I've been a professional copywriter for over 35 years. I also had epilepsy for decades. My mission is advocacy; to increase education, awareness and funding for epilepsy research. Together, we can make a huge difference. If not changing the world, at least helping each other, with wisdom, compassion and sharing.

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