Epilepsy Talk

Top-Rated Seizure Monitors | July 17, 2012


Peace of mind. A good night’s sleep. Safety and assurance.

Although these seizure monitors can’t make any guarantees, they can go a long way towards detecting danger. And maybe even saving a life.

Here are the most prominent models:

Medpage Epileptic Nocturnal Convulsive Seizure Monitors  http://www.medpage-ltd.com/epilepsy%20seizure%20detector.html

The Medpage range of seizure monitors are designed to detect Tonic-Clonic seizures, which they do very successfully with the majority of patients. Partial or absence seizures would not be detected where only facial or occasional limb twitching occurs. It is not recommended to attempt to use a monitor to detect those seizure types.

A sensor is placed between the bed base and the mattress. When a seizure begins, the muscular convulsions are detected by the bed sensor(s). All models feature an adjustable delay control, used to allow a certain amount of movement before an alarm is generated. The bed sensor sensitivity level can be adjusted to compensate for patient weight, type of bed base and mattress type. All Medpage models feature an anti-tamper alarm to warn if switched off by patient.

MP2 Nocturnal Epileptic Convulsive Seizure Monitor (UK only, but shipping quotes available.)   http://www.medpage-ltd.com/page24.html

The MP2 incorporates a bed sensor for convulsive seizure detection and is equipped with a microphone for the detection of aural sounds.

Three simple controls provide bed sensor and microphone sensitivity and movement alarm delay. The sensor is positioned under the patient’s mattress. Should seizure activity begin, the sensor detects the abnormal movement. When the movement has continued beyond the delay setting, an alarm output is generated. The MP2 is equipped with a transmitter that sends an identification signal to a radio pager, desktop alarm receiver and or a telephone auto dialer.

MP5 Convulsive Seizure Detector Single Sensor Alarm (US, UK, Europe, Australia)  http://www.medpage-ltd.com/page25.html

The MP5 is used for people above 56 lbs. (for monitoring 1 person) and is supplied with two radio pagers.

A sensor is placed between the bed base and the mattress. When a seizure begins, the muscular convulsions are detected by the bed sensor(s). All models feature an adjustable delay control, used to allow a certain amount of movement before an alarm is generated. The bed sensor sensitivity level can be adjusted to compensate for patient weight, type of bed base and mattress type. All Medpage models feature anti-tamper alarms to warn if switched off by patient.

The MP5 is the most popular seizure monitor with over 6,000 monitors in use worldwide.

ST2 Epileptic Seizure Monitor Alarm System (US, UK)  http://www.medpage-ltd.com/page65.html

The ST2 is used for infants 14lbs. and up and all other ages.

It is designed to detect shaking or jerking movements such as those encountered during convulsive seizures and will also detect milder seizure type movements.  In some cases, the unit may also detect the loss of breathing and bed absence by providing dual detection functionality, seizure monitoring and bed occupancy detection. A sensor is placed under the user’s mattress, bed or cot. During sleep, movements from the patient are monitored by the ST-2 microprocessor. Prolonged irregular movements result in an alarm being generated by the monitor with a signal transmitted to the alarm pager or other alarm in use with the ST-2 monitor.

Emfit Movement Monitor (US, Canada)   http://www.emfit.com/en/care/products_care/movement-monitor/

The Emfit Movement Monitor consists of two main components; a flexible and durable bed sensor (L-4060SL) which is placed under the mattress, and a bed-side monitor (D-2090-2G) with sophisticated embedded software. The Movement Monitor detects when a person has continuous quick-paced movements over a pre-set period of time and then triggers a notification. The system also notices light movements, thus making it equally suitable for small children.

The control unit can be placed next to the bed, or on the wall, using the included fastening bracket. It is operated with 2 standard AA size 1.5 V batteries. An optional, medical grade AC adapter is also available.

Aremco (US, UK)  http://www.disabilityworld.com/co/company.php?ID=3460

Aremco are leaders in the field of providing monitoring systems for detection of symptoms which may be associated with epileptic seizures.

The system provides a multifunction monitor with sensor systems including a movement sensor plate, microphone and moisture sensors. The system can detect seizure related movements, breathing movements associated with respiration, respiration rate, transient sounds, excess moisture or fluids, and bed occupancy. Audible alarms can be set for all of these parameters.

UMP Battery-Operated Infrared Bed / Chair Monitor  http://www.stanleyhealthcare.com/solutions/resident-safety/fall-management/ump/monitors

The UMP Infrared Bed Monitor alerts the caregiver when an individual attempts to leave the bed.

The monitor uses infrared technology to discreetly monitor any movement from a bed. There are no cumbersome pads or cushions. The device works by emitting a harmless infrared signal that alerts the caregiver, either by triggering an audible alarm or by sending an electronic signal to a remote location through a call system.

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NEW Monitors:

The SmartWatch — A motion detecting and alerting wristwatch that can detect seizures and alert caregivers within seven to 10 seconds. http://www.smart-monitor.com/
For details and pricing information, please call 1-888-334-5045.

Epilepsy Detector Application — An accelerometer based mobile phone application that uses advanced signal processing to detect epileptic seizures. It runs on most mobile phones that support SMS messaging, movement detection and GPS position location. http://www.epdetect.com/

SAMi — A night vision monitor used to monitor and record abnormal sleep movements. Runs on an iOS device such as an iPhone or iPod Touch. http://www.samialert.com/

Other articles of interest:

Home Testing Devices Could Monitor Epilepsy, Drug Levels, Reduce Clinical Visits http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2013/12/131209143250.htm?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+sciencedaily%2Fhealth_medicine%2Fepilepsy+%28ScienceDaily%3A+Health+%26+Medicine+News+–+Epilepsy+Research%29

RTI International Continues Development of Mobile Seizure Alert System for Epilepsy Patients http://www.newswise.com/articles/rti-international-continues-development-of-mobile-seizure-alert-system-for-epilepsy-patients

Mobile Apps Can Save Billions in Health Costs http://www.medpagetoday.com/PracticeManagement/InformationTechnology/43397?xid=nl_mpt_guptaguide_2013-12-12&utm_source=guptaguide&utm_medium=email&utm_content=mpt&utm_campaign=12|12|2013&userid=678261&eun=g5845718d10r&email=pfj@pfjohnson.com&mu_id=5845718

At-Home Seizure Tests Promising http://www.medpagetoday.com/MeetingCoverage/AES/43349?xid=nl_mpt_DHE_2013-12-11&utm_content=&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=DailyHeadlines&utm_source=WC&eun=g678262d0r&userid=678262&email=pfjohnson@comcast.net&mu_id=5845719

 


17 Comments »

  1. We must be on the same brain waves. Last few weeks, i’ve been thinking about monitors that will alert people of oncoming seizures. I was thinking that the heart rate goes up before a seizure. I’m not sure about this, but if it does, then i think that could be used as a warning device too. I’ve been meaning to buying a heart rate monitor to see if this is actually true.

    My aura’s are not as good as before and sometimes i get false auras. I’m lucky though i do get auras, in time for me to get to my emergency pill, before it’s to late. Once my hand starts to flail, it would be incredible difficult to get the meds out. Especially living alone.

    Comment by Zolt — July 17, 2012 @ 4:32 PM

    • Well then, I guess an aura is your friend. Otherwise, it wouldn’t be easy (or even possible?) to get your meds.

      The good news is that recent articles have discussed the possibility of delivering an antiepileptic drug quickly by nasal spray.

      So you’d have something quick, once you felt an aura. Or even during cluster seizures.

      Klonopin, Valium, Ativan, and Midazolam nasal sprays are still under study.

      (Ask your neuro about them, because they’re relatively new.)

      Comment by Phylis Feiner Johnson — July 17, 2012 @ 5:13 PM

      • I’ve read about the nasal sprays here on your column i think. It would be quick and convenient, but i would rather put the pill under my tongue, there just seems something nasty about nasal sprays. :) Right now my epill is Ativan and so far, it’s stopped my seizures. I’ve had 7 so far this yr, once a month on average.

        Comment by Zolt — July 17, 2012 @ 5:47 PM

  2. These are great for those that have movement or aura. I wish I had an aura at times. These items sound great!

    Comment by Toni Robison — July 17, 2012 @ 4:52 PM

    • Mmmmmmm…you’d love my aura. Salivating (like a bloodhound) with a disgusting metallic taste in my mouth.

      At least I know it’s time to hit the floor!

      Comment by Phylis Feiner Johnson — July 17, 2012 @ 5:16 PM

  3. [...] http://epilepsytalk.com/2012/07/17/top-rated-seizure-monitors/ Share this:TwitterFacebookLinkedInLike this:LikeBe the first to like this. [...]

    Pingback by Top-Rated Seizure Monitors « epilepsyconnection — August 1, 2012 @ 11:28 AM

  4. Where do you get the Aremco monitor? I don’t see anywhere to order from on the link listed above. My 4yo son had two big long lasting seizures where his breathing was compromised and neither were convulsive. We are worried about him having one at night and need some way to monitor him so he can go back to his room. He is on Keppra. The Emfit does not seem like would do us any good for his case.

    Comment by Michelle Y Dyszelski — December 4, 2012 @ 2:33 PM

  5. You can try emailing them at aremco@ontel.com. That’s your best bet, because they’re a British company.

    Comment by Phylis Feiner Johnson — December 4, 2012 @ 4:20 PM

  6. Any reccommendations for seizure wrist monitors? My sister lives alone & has frequent grand mals. Thanks,

    Comment by Miriam — February 7, 2013 @ 10:58 PM

  7. Yes! There’s a brand new seizure sensing monitor that’s a WRISTWATCH.

    It’s called a SmartWatch and has a GPS plus a sensor to detect the motions that occur during a grand mal seizures.

    It then records the time, duration and location of the occurrences and sends that information via Bluetooth to the accompanying app on your Android smartphone.

    The app tracks and stores the info and automatically calls your designated caretakers to alert them of the seizure.

    The watch also has physical buttons on the side that allow users to cancel a false alert or manually send one out with a single press.

    For details and pricing information, please call 1-888-334-5045.

    Comment by Phylis Feiner Johnson — February 8, 2013 @ 10:25 AM

  8. [...] in case you didn't have time, here's a page rating seizure alarms, they go under the matress…. Top-Rated Seizure Monitors | Epilepsy Talk and here's a page to order the North American one: Emfit Ltd – Emfit Movement Monitor / USA and [...]

    Pingback by Carver update - Page 5 — April 14, 2013 @ 11:15 PM

  9. Hello. I have been looking at these apps. Call Up and Bitfit flex- health bracelet that monitor sleep n fitness n daily patterns . Was wondering if these would be beneficial to people with epilepsy? Help.monitor their health for themselves and doctors. I had suggested to Up if it could adopt to a person with a seizure disorder. Like add a alarm to there restbands.

    Comment by Vanessa — August 19, 2013 @ 3:42 AM

  10. Funny you should ask. I read the info about the SmartWatch on epilepsy.com (where it’s actully being endorsed and advertised) and I have to believe it’s the real deal.

    Take a look at these links and see what you think.

    New! SmartWatch — a seizure sensing wristwatch.

    http://www.epilepsygroup.com/newsletter_notes.php?idseccion=6&idsubseccion=35&idnota=33

    http://www.engadget.com/2012/04/04/hands-on-with-smart-monitors-smartwatch-the-seizure-sensing-wr/

    Comment by Phylis Feiner Johnson — August 19, 2013 @ 9:14 AM

  11. I have my 9 year old daughter who is suffering from epilepsy. The information you have shared here is extremely useful for people like me. Thanks for sharing.

    Comment by Chris Tyler — October 31, 2013 @ 5:24 AM

  12. Any time we can help, we’re here!

    Comment by Phylis Feiner Johnson — October 31, 2013 @ 9:11 AM

  13. Those uplifting feelings also worked to become simple strategy to comprehend different people have a similar passion exactly like my very own to learn significantly more in terms of the issue. I am certain you will find a whole lot more agreeable examples at the start for people that begin reading your website. %KW%
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    Comment by Abigail — December 15, 2013 @ 10:23 PM

    • Thanks Abigail. I thought your article about freedom was very compelling. (Once I translated it!)

      Comment by Phylis Feiner Johnson — December 16, 2013 @ 9:39 AM


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    Phylis Feiner Johnson

    Phylis Feiner Johnson

    I've been a professional copywriter for over 35 years. I've also had epilepsy for decades. My mission is advocacy; to increase education, awareness and funding for epilepsy research. Together, we can make a huge difference. If not changing the world, at least helping each other, with wisdom, compassion and sharing.

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