Epilepsy Talk

Weird Epilepsy Triggers… | September 19, 2011


Here’s a list of uncommon epilepsy triggers you may have experienced or know about. Feel free to add to this list of the weird and the unknown…

Atmospheric Conditions

Changes in air pressure or any sudden action, (like arising from a prone position too quickly), can act as an instant stressor. Like taking off or landing in an airplane…going up or down on a fast elevator or escalator…

Barometric Pressure

Weather differences such as sudden changes in temperature, dark skies, thunder, or bright, hot sunlight and humidity may be a definite trigger for some.

Body Toxins

Exposure to toxins in our air, water or food, can cause everything from vomiting, diarrhea, liver or renal failure, blood sugar levels, and electrolyte imbalances. Constipation can be added to the list also. When these things happen, all the toxins already in our system build up. It also might be a side-effect of your drugs or it may cause the effectiveness of your medications, but ether way, you are at risk.

Boredom

You always thought you could be “bored to death” but it can also incite a seizure. By being isolated, having no social interactions, diversions, or recreational activities – all that’s left is to think about yourself and anticipate when your next seizure will come.

Casinos

The flashing lights and all the noise and hubbub at a casino — ringing bells, blaring music, — is enough to give anyone a headache, no less a seizure.

Dental Problems

Have your teeth and gums checked regularly. Some of your medications just love the calcium found in teeth and bones, making them fragile and prone to breakages and disease. Dental disease can no longer be considered a minor problem with just your gums and teeth. Your state of health (especially the state of your immune system), whether you still have amalgam fillings, the amount of mercury you’ve been exposed to over time, and the amount still present in your body, directly influence the number and severity of your symptoms. You’ll never achieve optimum health if you have poor oral health.

Diabetes

People with hyperglycemia tend to have focal or local seizures. And those who are hypoglycemic, tend to have tonic-clonic seizures. To keep your blood sugar from fluctuating, eat a good breakfast when you wake up. Complex carbohydrates will help start your day and give you sustained energy throughout. Also, try to eat wholesome snacks often during the day to keep your system balanced.

Grapefruit

It has been proven that grapefruit/juice/rind/skin can negatively affect some medications. You are probably saying “but I thought these grapefruits were good for me and my health?” Grapefruit juice provides many nutrients such as Vitamin C, but chemicals in grapefruit interfere with enzymes that break down certain medications in your digestive system which, in turn, causes a high risk of bringing on seizures. Tegretol in any form is one of the main anti-epilepsy medications that grapefruit affects.

Hyperventilation

Sometimes in a stressful situation, it’s the body’s way of saying there is confusion in the brain and it just doesn’t know where to turn. Oxygen is not getting to your brain and the hyperventilation expends vast amounts of energy. You could be in shock and this is where it is difficult to tell whether it is a response from an over stimulated brain or a true seizure. But you could go on to have an epileptic seizure following the stress and lack of oxygen. (For a long time, hyperventilation has been used as a means to provoke seizures. It’s often used to trigger epileptiform discharges and/or seizures during EEGs.)

Immersion in Hot or Cold Water

Anything done too suddenly (a quick change of any kind) can lead to a seizure. Going from cold to a warm temperature, or going from a warm house to a bitter cold day outdoors can shock your system. When having a bath it is best to have the bath water warm rather than hot as getting into a hot bath, along with the added humidity present in the bathroom also may be enough to trigger a seizure. When immersing yourself in cold water it is best to do this gradually and make sure you have another person with you to ensure your safety.

Low Blood Sugar Level

This leads to an insufficient supply of nutrients to the brain causing brain degeneration.

Migraines

People with epilepsy are more than twice as likely to develop migraine headaches as those without seizures. Research showed that more than 20 percent of people with epilepsy have migraines, compared to 11 percent of the general population. And there’s an overlap in the two conditions. In another epilepsy study, about 16% of those people who had migraines also experienced epileptic seizures before, during or after a migraine.

Odors and Perfumes

Perfume directly affects the brain and has both a physiological and a psychological effect upon our respiration and breathing, as well as upon our moods and thoughts. Although our sense of smell declines with age, you need to be aware that strong or even subtle smells or perfumes can be one of your triggers for seizures. Sometimes a person who has experienced some seizure activity brought about by a particular odor may not discuss it because they think other people, even their doctors, will think they’re crazy. But it’s for real. And then there are other odors, much less enticing, some of which include paint, hairspray, cleaning products, ammonia, kerosene, car exhaust fumes, gasoline and solvents.

Mah-Jong

Apparently, playing this thinking game, which can require intense concentration, can induce seizures. (You heard it first here!)

Music

Musicogenic epilepsy is a form of reflexive epilepsy in which a seizure is triggered by music or specific frequencies. Sensitivity to music varies from person to person. Some people are sensitive to a particular tone from a voice or instrument. Others are sensitive to a particular musical style or rhythm. Still others are sensitive to a range of noises.

Overeating

Causes hardening of the brain arteries, leading to a decrease in mental power.

Ramadan

During Ramadan, healthy adult Muslims are required to fast between dawn and sunset which can be a challenge, particularly if you have epilepsy and need anti-epilepsy drugs more than once a day. Recent research has found there was an increase in the number of seizures experienced during the holy month which was probably due to changes in the way anti-epilepsy drugs were taken, sleep patterns being disturbed, going for a long time without food, plus any emotional stress and fatigue.

Sleep Apnea

Sleep apnea includes pauses in breathing, indicated by gasping, snoring or difficulty in breathing during the night. It is more common in men than in women, and often occurs in larger people whose throat muscles and fat tissue cause an obstruction while they’re sleeping. These pauses in breathing can easily be confused with seizures. In fact, having apnea can trigger seizures. Having seizures can also trigger apnea; so it can work either way.

Talking Rarely

Intellectual conversations will promote the efficiency of the brain.

Water

Yes, you can have too much of a good thing. Water is good for us, but it can dilute your medications. It’s best to spread your fluid intake over the day. Your body needs a balance of salt and water. And be cautious of drinking water from plastic bottles and leaving them lying around in the heat.

 

To subscribe to Epilepsytalk.com and get the latest articles, go to the bottom box of the right column and click on “Sign me up!”

 

Another article that may be of interest is:

Common Epilepsy Triggers

http://epilepsytalk.com/2010/03/02/common-epilepsy-triggers/

 

Resources:

http://www.myamazingearth.com/2012/07/10-brain-damaging-habits/html

http://www.2betrhealth.com/Other-Triggers-for-Seizures.html

http://www.atkinsforseizures.com/dietary-chemical-seizure-triggers.html

http://community-1.webtv.net/@HH!A3!A6!9DCA6306F44A/MzMinnieMouse/Understanding/page7.html

http://www.epilepsy.org.uk/info/seizures/possible-seizure-triggers/ramadan

http://www.coping-with-epilepsy.com/forums/f21/seizure-triggers-casinos-798/

http://www.coping-with-epilepsy.com/forums/f22/mah-jong-epilepsy-new-reflex-epilepsy-1061/

http://www.diagnose-me.com/cond/C599075.html

 

 


67 Comments »

  1. Great link Phylis – so great that I’ve given you another link from my site:
    http://aboutheadinjury.wordpress.com/

    Comment by Stephen Hughes — September 19, 2011 @ 9:11 PM

  2. When I had bronchitis and was coughing so severely, the doctor surprised me when he said, “If we can’t get this coughing under control you could have a seizure.” It was so bad that it caused pain in the back of my head, the back of my neck, and my shoulder blades. I think this would be considered an extreme, as in hot to cold or cold to hot. It just shook my body so much. This is an interesting list. Thank you.

    Comment by Maggie — September 19, 2011 @ 9:30 PM

    • Careful Maggie,

      Certain over-the-counter medications (Advil and Tylenol are fine but never take aspirin!) can make you more likely to have a seizure. For example, antihistamines are possible seizure triggers.

      Comment by Phylis Feiner Johnson — September 20, 2011 @ 12:03 AM

      • Hi Maggie,

        Do you experience bronchitis often? Or even once a Yr? Does your DR prescribe the Zip Pac (3 day) anti-biotic? Has your DR ever performed/suggested a FEV1 test (breathing test)

        Your comment shocked me, also. I figured loss of oxygen may trigger seizures, I had just never thought of my bronchitis coughs as a trigger. :( Which makes sense. :(

        Love Candi

        Comment by candi — September 20, 2011 @ 6:12 PM

  3. I remember back in the 80′s when the psychedelic
    lights and colors could cause people to have seizures.

    Comment by mkfarnam — September 19, 2011 @ 11:15 PM

    • I guess you’re from the disco era, too! :-)

      I remember a diasterous date where the guy took me dancing.

      So, we’re out on the dance floor jiving…and you know what dancing looked then.

      I was having a seizure but no one noticed. I looked like everyone else, quaking and shaking.

      But when the music ended, everyone went back to their tables. (It was quite crowded on the dance floor.)

      Meanwhile, without the crowds to prop me up, I melted to the floor.

      Last date with that guy!!!

      Comment by Phylis Feiner Johnson — September 20, 2011 @ 12:11 AM

      • Like the wicked witch,LOL

        Yes we’re Baby Boomers.

        Comment by mkfarnam — September 20, 2011 @ 12:28 AM

  4. I would say, anything that could effect your nerves, can most likely cause some people to a seizure.

    I’d think that a persons immune system would have alot to do with it..

    Comment by mkfarnam — September 19, 2011 @ 11:24 PM

    • Like melting on the dance floor. “Ha, ha, ha…I’ll get you my little sweetie.”

      Am I off topic?

      Comment by Phylis Feiner Johnson — September 20, 2011 @ 2:20 AM

      • Your the moderator.

        Comment by mkfarnam — September 20, 2011 @ 2:55 AM

  5. My first seizures were spots! I told my mom and then wanted to throw-up and was out like a light! She told me I shook! I don’t remember except the headache at the end and the numbness on one side of the body. Crazy!

    Bronchitis be careful on that one! I ended up in the hospital on that one! My asthma kicked end when I was older. My Internist made me work out more but these wonderful meds made me have osteoporosis :)

    Walking outside or inside (treadmill) in front TV. helped the asthma and seizures.

    Music does it with me ,,, did it in the monitoring unit and the next thing I now they are asking me questions and I was listening to Mozart. Then off I went. My mom wanted me to be an organist but music and my brain make me walk in circles !!!!

    I also have deja-vu and funny feelings! Then to wonderful “seizure world!” Tra-la-la ! Phylis something is in the air!!!

    Comment by Toni Robison — September 20, 2011 @ 8:17 PM

    • Research has suggested that Mozart’s K448 piano concerto can actually reduce the number of seizures!

      Comment by Phylis Feiner Johnson — September 20, 2011 @ 8:29 PM

  6. Don’t try this at home

    But there are a few things that could create an impact to any person with epilepsy and no one would have a siezure.

    one is:
    If they were hit by a train. lol!

    Comment by mkfarnam — September 20, 2011 @ 11:42 PM

    • Hi Mike,
      Sometimes I wonder if you’re on more than just AED’s. LOL

      Comment by Charlie — September 22, 2011 @ 6:54 PM

      • Hi Charlie,
        IMO It’s like this.
        People with a disability have a choise.

        You can either have a sense of humor and make the best out of what you have.
        Or
        You can be depressed about your disability,
        and live a life of misery.

        But that’s only my opinion.

        “No offense intented to anyone.”

        Comment by mkfarnam — September 22, 2011 @ 7:20 PM

  7. I think you’re preaching to the choir here! ;-)

    Comment by Phylis Feiner Johnson — September 22, 2011 @ 7:50 PM

  8. I agree with both of you, haha
    now as to the subject at hand, at one time in my journey thru Epilepsy, going from a warm car or building and stepping out into a misty or foggy atmosphere was a sure fire trigger when I felt it on my skin.
    I use the term “journey” because as I’ve goten older during the past 30 years my seizures kept changing and getting worse, the trigger’s would change somewhat but not always. not getting enough sleep would make for a wild day or two seizure wise. The full moon was a particular scary time. I was guaranteed a bunch of doozys that time of the month. Some would say that’s not possible, but it was true for me as long as I can remember. and last but not least was changing meds, during my guinnea pig years.

    Comment by Charlie — September 23, 2011 @ 12:20 AM

    • “Patients often have firm beliefs about the immediate precipitant of their seizures. Many of them claim that seizures are triggered or worsened by the full moon, whereas 80% of emergency nurses and 64% of emergency physicians believe that the moon does affect the mental health of patients.

      In a scientific study of 12,156 neurologic cases, 859 cases manifesting epileptic seizures were identified. Five hundred thirty-six patients (62.4%) were men and 323 (37.6%) were women.

      A striking increase in overall seizure occurrences was observed for both genders during the full-moon days, while at all other cycles of the lunar month, the rates of seizure occurrence were significantly lower, ranging between 21.4% for the new-moon days to 22.5% for the first quarter of lunar days.”
      http://www.neurology.org/content/66/9/1442.full

      Comment by Phylis Feiner Johnson — September 23, 2011 @ 3:26 PM

      • So they’ve determined that epilepsy is a voodoo curse?

        Comment by mkfarnam — September 23, 2011 @ 3:31 PM

  9. I really don’t know what triggers my seizures. Most of the time I don’t know I’ve had one until it’s all said and done. At one time I could determine how bad they were by the amout of blood, cuts and bruises. Also by the way I felt. Sometimes I’d wake up and walk around trying to figure out were I was.
    For about the last 20 years I’ve only had them(mostly) while I was asleep and only knew by the way I felt when I got the next day.
    At times I would get this strange feeling in my stomach and that was a sign of a seizure coming on.
    Other times i may have thought of some bad experience in the past, or come accross a specific odor or sound and it was like a wand was waved over top of me, a feeling would run through me like a magic spell.
    And that’s all she wrote.

    Comment by mkfarnam — September 23, 2011 @ 2:26 AM

  10. do somebody has grand mal from syrene (police car/fire track) ?

    Comment by ALEKSEY — September 24, 2011 @ 10:13 PM

    • Hi ALEKSEY
      I’ve heard that high pitched sounds can trigger a seizure.
      We have tornado sirens that are tested every month. Just the sound when they go off gives me the chills. So I’m sure they can also be a trigger seizures.
      .

      Comment by mkfarnam — September 25, 2011 @ 6:34 PM

  11. Hi Aleksey & anyone else reading, :)

    Yes, sirens & other loud noises (even a phone ringing ) can be possible triggers for some.

    Phylis listed quite a few unusual Triggers. Here is a Link to a page another lady wrote, about Other Seizure Triggers, that includes a few Phylis mite have missed. :) The part about noises is toward the bottom of the page. :)

    http://www.2betrhealth.com/Other-Triggers-for-Seizures.html

    Love Candi

    Comment by candi — September 27, 2011 @ 2:04 PM

  12. I’ve read all of your input and appreciate all of you. I’ve had seizures since I was 16 but wasn’t diagnosed till I was 32. Then a drug guinea pig for about 15 yrs and “glad” to know other people still struggle w/o complete control.Sorry for your struggles too. Your triggers bring light to all of mine too. Music,memories,arguments w/a son, hot-cold. Husband thought it would be fun to splash cold water in the pool to get used to the water. Ending wasn’t pleasant. Keeping fun after flopping like a carp helps too. The big ones are over. Still deal w/the partial ones. I make sure I keep friends that have a better memory than I do on the bad days too. God has a way of putting good people in my path like you. thanks.

    Comment by Ann — September 27, 2011 @ 3:21 PM

    • It is Great to know others’ are on or have been on the same Journey. Yet, there is sooo much More to Learn. :) It’s Good that you know your Triggers. :) The hard part is avoiding them. Especially around PPL who Don’t Know or Forget. :(

      I Thank God for the PPL who surround me & Have Supported me over the Yrs. But, actually talking to others’ w/ Epilepsy & sharing, Researching, advising has been a form of Therapy for me. :) I have been seizure free, except for some breakthrus & possible partials last yr, for over 20 yrs. :)

      Welcome to Epilepsy Talk. Feel free to voice your opinion/advise at any time. And if you Do have Questions we can help. :)

      Love Candi

      Comment by candi — September 28, 2011 @ 12:45 PM

  13. Keeping friends informed is a very good idea.

    Ann, do you have a good neuro?

    Does your husband go with you to the doctor?
    http://epilepsytalk.com/2010/06/13/three-secrets-to-better-care-from-your-doctor/

    Any questions?

    Welcome aboard. We’re happy to have you with us!!!

    Comment by Phylis Feiner Johnson — September 27, 2011 @ 4:10 PM

  14. Hi Phylis,

    I was just reading some of the input on this subject on CWE. Epileric may have found Research to argue w/ some of your Triggers. But, I disagree w/ him. My Mom started having absence seizures last yr. Her blood was Definitely Mercury Toxic! Doc de-toxed her & so far No More seizures. And I know the DRS in Washington State blamed Atmospheric conditions, at one point, for my Sis. So, are these Really Scams as he suggests? Drs just Guessing? I don’t think so! Just cuz the Majority of PPL (Like how many PPL did they Test? All of Us? HAHA ) do not experience these Triggers does Not mean it’s Impossible! Not in my Book! You can tell Epileric I said So! :) HEHE And, No, I am Not going to join CWE just to add my 2 cents. :) Sides, I ain’t sure he would be willing to Agree to Disagree. :) And they have Plenty of Supporters/advisers as it is. :)

    Comment by candi — September 29, 2011 @ 5:14 PM

    • There are a few things I’d like to tell Epileric…and none of them are choice.

      But the funny thing is that the thread’s real popular, despite his disclaimers!

      Comment by Phylis Feiner Johnson — September 29, 2011 @ 5:43 PM

  15. Oh & I thought of another weird trigger. Lack of Nutrients/supplements. Sodium, Potassium, Magnesium. Just to name a few. :)

    Links for Epileric about the Mercury.

    http://www.mercurypoisoned.com/new/mercury_connection_and_seizures.html

    http://www.valleyhealthmag.com/articles/MercuryFillings.html

    And this article says it All. DANG SCARY!

    http:action.earthday.net/p/dia/action/public?action_KEY=7023

    Comment by candi — September 29, 2011 @ 5:26 PM

  16. I had a list of the 10 most smoggyest cities in the US.
    Memphis was #1, Pittsburg #2 and I noticed that everyone of these cities are on or near a waterway.

    Exhaust(smog) Emmission Control is a maditory law in California.
    If you have a vehile that’s newer than 1992 and you get caught with the slightest exhaust leak, your fined and your vehicle is ban from the road until the leak is fixed and it must be inspected before your allowed to drive on the road again.
    When register or renew your registration, you must also pass a smog inspection test before it’s approved.
    I’m in OK, but my truck is still equipped with with smog devices because it was bought in Ca.

    Even lawnmowers out there are equipped with a smog device. It’s a small fine mesh screen about the size of your thumb. The mower will run without it. But it can’t be sold in Ca. without it.
    You may have seen stickers on some things that say “not to be sold in California”.
    That’s because it doesnt meet the Ca, EPA code.

    Comment by mkfarnam — September 29, 2011 @ 6:44 PM

  17. Hi Mike,

    I think those inspections should be in every State. And every State Should Enforce Inspections!

    I take it you read the earthday Link? :) I want Phylis to post that link on CWE. Show that guy there is more to Mercury Poisoning than just Tooth Fillings (amalgam? ) :)

    Have a Good Day. Glad I don’t live in them Smoggy areas. :( Not to say there ain’t none here. I live near a waterway too. The Colorado River is 2 blocks from my house. And even though we are a small town, I see the skies turn brown w/ introverted air, occasionally. I stay inside on them days. :(

    Comment by candi — September 29, 2011 @ 7:39 PM

  18. The skies in SoCal were always a dirty yellowish brown color and thay always put out smog alerts.
    I can’t believe that LA wasn’t even on the worst 10 list.

    Comment by mkfarnam — September 29, 2011 @ 8:06 PM

  19. There’s a person about to join our support group that developed Epilepsy after a joint replacement surgery. I never thought surgery could trigger Epilepsy. Anyone else heard of that?

    Comment by Charlie — January 19, 2012 @ 9:19 PM

  20. I haven’t heard of it happening before. But the surgeon must have done some nerve damage.

    Comment by mkfarnam — January 19, 2012 @ 9:50 PM

    • Thanks Mike, that makes sense.

      Comment by Charlie — January 19, 2012 @ 10:58 PM

  21. That’s so smart Mike!

    I looked up joint replacement and found nothing. I looked up anesthesia — and seizures afterwards seemed to be anecdotal (unless you had epilepsy in the first place).

    If I hadn’t read my email in such a hurry (or in time sequence) I would have seen Mike’s reply and saved half an hour of “researching.”

    So much for innate intelligence vs. those of us who have to research every little morsel! :-)

    Comment by Phylis Feiner Johnson — January 19, 2012 @ 10:30 PM

  22. Pokemon Seizures Linked to Epilepsy, Not TV

    Children Who Had Seizures After Watching Cartoon Had Underlying Disease

    http://www.webmd.com/epilepsy/news/20040721/pokemon-seizures-linked-epilepsy-not-tv

    Comment by Phylis Feiner Johnson — October 8, 2012 @ 12:33 PM

  23. Toothbrushing Triggers Rare Seizures

    Researchers Report 3 Patients With Reflex Epilepsy Suffer Seizures From Brushing Teeth

    http://www.webmd.com/epilepsy/news/20070305/toothbrushing-triggers-rare-seizures

    Comment by Phylis Feiner Johnson — October 8, 2012 @ 12:38 PM

  24. Mum who is 74 has tonic clonic seizures even with medication. Normally gets one after a stressful or exciting day. Now I wake her up in the morning after 8.00am and get her to lie down or sleep at about 10.30am and again at about 3.00pm. It’s exeactly one month since her last seizure. Yet to see whether it will help.

    Comment by Mary — November 30, 2012 @ 8:11 PM

  25. Hi Mary,

    Well you hit the nail right on the head. Stress is the #1 seizure trigger.

    Stress can trigger hyperventilation which can provoke seizures. It can increase cortisol, known as “the stress hormone” because cortisol is secreted in higher levels during the body’s “fight or flight” response to stress. And, as you may imagine, it’s responsible for several stress-related changes in the body which also may influence seizure activity.

    Negative emotions related to stress, such as anger, worry or fright, may also cause seizures. This happens because the limbic system, the portion of the brain that regulates emotion, is one of the most common places for seizures to begin.

    Another common trigger is lack of sleep.

    Inadequate or fragmented sleep can set off seizures in lots of people. In one study, the lowest risk for seizures was during REM sleep (when dreams occur). The highest risk was during light non-REM stages of sleep.

    Sounds like you’re on the right track!

    Comment by Phylis Feiner Johnson — November 30, 2012 @ 11:41 PM

  26. I will agree on hot water being a seizure trigger, because I have experienced this on a few occasions. Also when a person gets depressed or upset, that is another severe problem of mine.

    Comment by Shawna — August 3, 2013 @ 3:35 PM

  27. BOREDOM-VERY TRUE!!! I always worked,sometimes 2 jobs. Neurologist was always nice,kept me seizure free. Retires,NEW NEURO come by,CHANGE/SWITCH my Meds fro Dilantin-few Days LATER what happens-SEIZURE!! Worst off Driving! Had,had nice career as LICENSED CERTIFIED Auto Mechanic w/2yr college degree-UNTIL,UNTIL new neuro changes meds;NOW here i sit no work,no drive. OH YEAH,forgot to say-MADE $16.00/hr weeks w/overtime-takehome pay(after taxes)$1000.00 THANKYOU Dr.!!

    Comment by Ed Hricak — September 21, 2013 @ 9:01 AM

  28. Aha! The grapefruits I ate recently might have caused the auras and/or seizures I have been experiencing. The last one is going in the garbage! Thanks again, Philis, for your blog.

    Comment by Laura M. — January 5, 2014 @ 4:14 PM

  29. sometimes i swear I can incite a seizure if I’m thinking about my past (like anything before my brainsurgery) took out my right temporal lobe and all but a lil hunk of my hippocampus. I lost too much blood so after 7 hrs they had to back out and leave that piece. Going back in to get it soon. Being that my seizures start there I suppose it could just be the seizure bringing up the memories instead

    Comment by Kate Grace Bradwin — January 21, 2014 @ 1:33 PM

  30. Do you think it could be traumatic brain injury as a result of the surgery? (That’s what happened to a good friend of mine.)

    Comment by Phylis Feiner Johnson — January 21, 2014 @ 1:55 PM

  31. Finally glad to read about change in cabin pressure after landing. Everytime I fly I end up in a complex partial seizure that I’m stuck in the entire trip. It looks like drunk and disorderly conduct. The only way I can come out of it is to go into the hospital and get a shot of a cocktail of seizure meds and sleeping pills so I sleep for a couple of days while the dr does an EEG also.

    Comment by Jenn — February 13, 2014 @ 8:55 PM

  32. Could you avoid this by taking extra meds before you go on a plane? I think you should ask your doc if there’s some way you can ward this off before it happens.

    It sounds horrid. And scary.

    Comment by Phylis Feiner Johnson — February 13, 2014 @ 9:28 PM

    • The anxiety of flying cant help much either.
      Good luck to you

      Comment by charlie — February 13, 2014 @ 10:12 PM

  33. I have a wedding in Jamaica so my dr is gonna have me try diastat and I’ll use it 15 min before I get off the plane. And I’m going to fly in a day early because I know I’ll sleep from that med. so fingers are crossed! It’s not until July but I’ll keep you posted.

    Comment by Jenn — February 15, 2014 @ 3:25 PM

  34. Sounds like you have your bases covered. Good luck.

    And have a wonderful time at the wedding!

    Comment by Phylis Feiner Johnson — February 15, 2014 @ 4:51 PM

    • Thanks!

      Comment by Jenn — February 15, 2014 @ 6:34 PM

  35. Great info. I also suffer from seizures due to numerous effects. Even going to family reunions which are emotional can cause me to have seizures. Grasping at straws for other solutions. Tried numerous approaches. Any other approaches?

    Comment by James Alto — February 18, 2014 @ 2:12 AM

  36. Well, at least you remember their names!

    I’m not trying to blow you off James, this is a BIG problem for all of us — especially the memory thing — and the stress that goes along with it.

    Try looking at “Memory Tips You (Hopefully) Won’t Forget!” It might help you in the memory/stress area, or at least inspire you.

    http://epilepsytalk.com/2014/02/09/memory-tips-you-hopefully-wont-forget/

    Also, weird as it may sound, even “happy” stress can trigger seizures!

    Sometimes, seizures occur immediately after a sudden and very stressful event. And we all know that stress is #1 in the hit parade of triggers.

    Take a look at this article, also. “Stress and Seizures”

    http://epilepsytalk.com/2013/07/02/stress-and-seizures-2/

    Hopefully, you’ll get something from one of them.

    Comment by Phylis Feiner Johnson — February 18, 2014 @ 10:05 AM

  37. Also fluorescent lighting which is in most offices. I kept having seizures at work and my dr asked about the lighting and said fluorescent light constantly flicker which can set off seizures and he recommended pink tinted sunglasses for it. I bought the sunglasses but never wore them cause I thought I looked silly and a lot of my coworkers thought I already got too many favortisims which were really reasonable accomadations like knowing when fire drills are gonna happen cause of the strobe lights.

    Comment by Jenn — February 25, 2014 @ 1:03 PM

  38. Well, not to sound too brash, but I had my boss replace the flickering fluorescent lights with incandescent lights.

    But I had an edge. Who would want their writer to go blind??? :-)

    Comment by Phylis Feiner Johnson — February 25, 2014 @ 4:29 PM

    • My last job did but then I transferred to another office that’s much bigger and I don’t think they would even though it’s a school for people with disabilities and many of them have seizures.

      Comment by Jenn — February 25, 2014 @ 8:26 PM

  39. You can’t hurt by asking.

    And so ironic that it’s a school for people with disabilities and many of them have seizures.

    Sigh.

    Comment by Phylis Feiner Johnson — February 25, 2014 @ 10:40 PM

  40. I have diabetes,rheumatoid arthritis, high blood pressure, asthma and epilepsy but I try to live life like it’s fine, most people see me and would never think anything is wrong with me, I am a very positive person, now my heart is giving me problems im 37 years old but sometimes I feel much older

    Comment by maria — May 9, 2014 @ 6:29 PM

    • I understand about having all the different problems. It’s not easy staying positive. Sometimes it’s impossible, there is too much pain. There are times when you need someone just to share some of that pain without trying to fix you or tell you how you have to trust God with the pain. We know that, but knowing it and doing it can be two very different things. I will feel your pain for a while and I will listen to you cry. I’ve had epilepsy for four years now, lost my job as an over the road truck driver, lost my excellent credit rating, my new semi- truck, and most of all the love of my life, my wife. The seizures were to much and the medication didn’t do my attitude any good. I am 58 and look 65. Social security says I’m not sick enough for their help and employers say they can’t use a man who has seizures while he’s working. Enough this is about you and your pain, I will listen, I will pray and I will be quiet. May God bless you and make his face to shine upon you.

      Comment by Gary — May 10, 2014 @ 1:05 PM

  41. Maria, I’d say you’re one very brave woman.

    Comment by Phylis Feiner Johnson — May 10, 2014 @ 8:01 AM

  42. Gary, don’t apologize, that’s what we’re here for — to share, help, give advice and sometimes, just give someone a big hug.

    I’m sure the loss of your wife must have been the most devastating of all.

    But Gary, please don’t feel bad about saying how you feel. At Epilepsy Talk you can express yourself whatever way you want.

    And by the way, welcome to our family!

    Comment by Phylis Feiner Johnson — May 10, 2014 @ 7:22 PM


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    About the author

    Phylis Feiner Johnson

    Phylis Feiner Johnson

    I've been a professional copywriter for over 35 years. I've also had epilepsy for decades. My mission is advocacy; to increase education, awareness and funding for epilepsy research. Together, we can make a huge difference. If not changing the world, at least helping each other, with wisdom, compassion and sharing.

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